go to www.euscreen.eu

ENUMERATE Core Survey

enumerate_logo

 

The third ENUMERATE core survey about cultural heritage is now open for participation.

All European cultural heritage institutions are encouraged to contribute. Together we can make the case for investments in our digital activities!

(more…)

Mapping the future of digital cultural heritage at EuropeanaTech 2015

Author: Gregory Markus
George Oates and Seb Chan at Europeana Tech. By: Europeana (CC-BY-SA)

George Oates and Seb Chan at Europeana Tech. By: Europeana (CC-BY-SA)

 

“Making the beautiful thing”; this was the theme for the EuropeanaTech 2015 Conference in Paris at the National Library of France on February 12 and 13. But what is the beautiful thing? 

Most people would say that art, paintings, photographs, stories and sculptures, are beautiful things. Though this is true, this was not a gathering of artists – at least not in the traditional sense. EuropeanaTech 2015 instead brought together a crowd of expert developers, innovators, and technical pioneers in the field of digital cultural heritage. The beautiful thing they are united in making? Meaningful interaction between the public and their cultural heritage. And, as Tim Sherratt from Trove reflected, it’s “an ambitious undertaking”.

(more…)

Enjoy the last day of Carnival season with these celebrations from around Europe!

Author: Yashar Dehaghani
nice

Photo source: Institut national de l’audiovisuel. All rights reserved.

 
 

It’s the last day of the season for carnivalistic joys and games, and Europe has a rich tradition for carnivals and merriment. We hope you have fun with these short clips from across the continent. Feel free to search for more spectacular celebrations on EUscreen.eu!

 

A carnival on roller-skates

 

rollerblades
It’s carnival season, and some carnivals are more mobile than others.

DR / Denmark 1957 [01:38]

Mardi Gras giant on fire

 

mardi_gras
During the Vierves-sur-Viroin carnival, a Giant is built and then sentenced to be burnt to the delight of the local population.

RTBF/Belgium 1986 [05:06]

Confetti and parades in Italy

 

italy_carnival
A swirl of confetti and parades floats from Taormina to Viareggio.

Luce/Italy 1958 [01:58]

Masks and costumes from Slovenia

 

slovenia
Carnival masks and preparation for the Carnival in Cerknica along with traditional carnival masks from Vrbice.

RTV SLO/Slovenia 1996 [03:24]

A literary performance in Romania

 

romania
A masked performance during carnival.

TVR/Romania 1964 [02:16]

An artist’s ball in Denmark

 

denmark
Artist carnival in the Odd-Fellow mansion in Copenhagen.

DR/Denmark 1951 [00:49]

 

Chirigota performs in Spain

 

spain
Performance by one of the “chirigota” groups that sing satirical songs about topics in the news during carnival festivities. In this case, the group sings about the war in Iraq.

TVC/Spain 2003 [01:21]

A candy war in Catalonia

 

catalonia
A look at the different ways of celebrating Carnival in Catalonia, such as the dance of the crazy giants in Solsona, the candy war in Vilanova i la Geltrú and the parade in Barcelona.

TVC/Spain 1986 [02:55]

Shrove Tuesday in Austria

 

astria
A report on the carnival in Sörg in Carinthia.

ORF/Austria 2011 [04:20]

Carnival in Nothing Hill

 

nothinghill
Picture shows one of the Carnival parades taking part in London’s Notting Hill Carnival which is held every August Bank holiday. It first began in 1964 and has become one of the biggest street festivals in the world.

BBC/United Kingdom 2001

Amazing parade sculptures in Nice

 

nice
The carnival floats by amidst the cheering crowds at place Masséna in Nice.

INA/France 1950 [00:37]

The truth about carnivals in Germany

 

germany
This continuing series on clichés about Germans deals this time with Germany’s so-called 5th season, carnival. Michael Wigge asks his countrymen what their attitude towards the merry and crazy tradition is and shows us what kind of costumes people come up with.

DW/Germany 2008 [03:42]







Apply now for FRAME 2015: Enhance the value of your media content

frame_2015_700x300_image_liste_article

 

FRAME is a training course on new technologies applied to the restoration, digitization, preservation and use of audiovisual and cinematographic archives.

The 2015 edition of the FRAME seminar, dedicated to European and non European professionals of the media industry, will take place in June and October, hosted by Ina EXPERT in partnership with EBU, FIAT/IFTA and Creative Europe.

In a fast and ever moving technological world, the management of audiovisual content evolves: digitization of analogue contents, long term preservation of born digital contents, description, accessibility through innovative ways of delivery and promotion are key issues. The FRAME training addresses, in 2 sessions, each step of the management of these contents.

The seminar is tailored to European and non-European professionals working in the field of audiovisual heritage and content management and allows for 15 participants per session.

Apply now to join this years FRAME seminar in Bry-sur-Marne, France or read more about the seminar on ina-expert.com

 

1st session program: Preservation & digitization of audiovisual media

22 to 26 June 2015

Methodological and technical issues for the implementation of digitization systems for film, video and sound archives, and the choice of formats, storage and digital content infrastructures.

 

2nd session program: Organization, marketing and use of archival digital content

19 to 23 October 2015

New uses of archives, which use for which users (professionals, researchers, and general public), documentation, rights’ management and physical and digital restoration of images.

 

Photo source: www.ina-expert.com/our-achievements/frame-2015.html

 

EXTENDED DEADLINE: “Archive Based Productions” Call for Papers

VIEW Journal for European Television History and Culture Vol. 4 Issue 08

*** Extended deadline: February 10, 2015 ***

icoon.icoIn 1927, when Esfir Schub released her commissioned film The fall of the Romanov Dynasty to commemorate the 10th anniversary of the October Revolution, she hardly knew that her extensive use of film footage and newsreels of the event would mark the invention of a new ‘genre’: the archive based production or compilation genre. Television has adopted this genre, but audiovisual archives have fuelled a wide array of programmes and genres beyond compilation productions.

Government, business, broadcast and film archives as well as amateur collections and home videos are commonly used to spark memories and re-enact events from the past in various contexts. They are made widely accessible and re-used in traditional broadcast productions or given a second life in digital environments through online circulation.

 

This issue of VIEW invites scholars, archivists, producers and other practitioners to consider, highlight and elaborate on the use and re-use of moving image archives in media productions (for cinema, television, web, etc.). Contributions are welcome in the form of (short) articles or video essays.

 

Proposals are invited to explore (but not limited to) the following topics and questions:

  • Has the digital environment created a paradigm shift in the use of audiovisual archival materials?
  • The authenticity of audiovisual archives in the digital environment;
  • In what ways can audiovisual archives transform our relationship to the past? What is the role of archives in helping us reconnect with or understand the past? How do national/organisational archive policies impact or limit the histories that are informed by these archives?
  • The audio-visual archive as proof, testimony or document of reality, as shared heritage or collective memory;
  • Case studies using moving images as historical sources;
  • The use of archives in creative productions;
  • Ahistoricism in the use of audiovisual archival materials;
  • Found footage in moving image productions;
  • Compilation programmes studied through issues of representation, distribution, production, reception, etc;
  • Various formats and subgenres of compilation programmes: biographies, historical productions, art forms, etc;
  • Comparative studies of the compilation genre;
  • The search for identity in audiovisual archive collections;
  • The use of national audiovisual collections in a European or international context.

Practical

  • Contributions are encouraged from authors with different kinds of expertise and interests in television and media history.
  • Paper proposals (max. 500 words) are due on January 31st, 2015. Extended deadline: February 10, 2015
  • Submissions should be sent to the managing editor of the journal, Dana Mustata (journal@euscreen.eu). A notice of acceptance will be sent to authors in the 3rd week of February
  • Articles (2 – 4,000 words) will be due on May 15th 2015.
  • For further information or questions about the issue, please contact the co-editors: Mette Charis Buchman (mch@dr.dk) and Claude Mussou (cmussou@ina.fr)

 

See www.viewjournal.eu for the current and back issues. VIEW is proud to be an open access journal. All articles are made findable through the DOAJ and EBSCO databases.

 

Photo credits: Felix Janssens CC BY-SA

 

VIEW Journal issue on “Convergent Television(s)” now available

VIEW Issue on Convergent Television(s) In March, we published the call for papers for the sixth issue of our open access journal VIEW, which explores Europe’s television history and culture. At the end of December, this latest issue found its way online and it is now available in its entirety at http://journal.euscreen.eu. All articles can be read on screen, where source materials can be found embedded in the article text, or saved as a PDF for reading offline.

The sixth issue is co-edited by Gabriele Balbi, Assistant Professor in Media Studies at the Università della Svizzera italiana, and Massimo Scaglioni, Assistant Professor of Media History at the Catholic University of Milan.

The history of media convergence, especially of convergent television, is a field that needed further investigation. Media convergence is often considered a taken-for-granted phenomenon, a kind of ‘irresistible’ force that has changed and is continuously changing media ecosystems. Furthermore, it seems to be mainly an American phenomenon because it has involved US politics and companies and because the most relevant reflections and publications on this topic come from American scholars.

This issue of VIEW tries to deal with this complex and polysemic concept from different points of view, adopting several theoretical and methodological frameworks. It attempts to counteract some of the aforementioned taken-for-granted ideas, analyzing TV convergence from a historical and long-term perspective, considering symmetrical case studies of success and failures, concentrating on the European dimension through the lens of transnational, comparative, and national contributions.

Table of Contents

  • Editorial – Gabriele Balbi, Massimo Scaglioni

Discoveries

Explorations

Publishing info

VIEW is published by the Netherlands Institute for Sound and Vision in collaboration with Utrecht University, University of Luxembourg and Royal Holloway University of London. It is supported by the EUscreenXL project, the European Television History Network and the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research.

Savouring the Festive Season…

While savouring your favourite Christmas cake,

we of course invite you to travel back in time and discover amazing stories on euscreen.eu.

 

But more importantly, our wishes to you…

 

May this time of year be like a breath of fresh air to you and your loved ones.

May it bring peace and joy to your homes.

May it fill you with energy and passion for the coming year.

 

From all at EUscreenXL

 

Christams Eve

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photo credits: Nederlands Instituut voor Beeld en Geluid CC-BY

 

 

 

Filed under:

Audiovisual history online: On the use of online audiovisual archives in scholarship – Call for Papers for IAMCR 2015

IAMCRTelevision has, throughout its existence, been regarded as a window to the world as well as a reflection of national and regional identities and cultures. The art of film has left us with a wealth of works which contribute to our visual world heritage. Television and film archives provide rich collections of images, sounds, and artefacts related to television broadcasts, film screenings, and production practices of both. As with so many archival collections, archive items not digitally born are being digitized, and increasingly collections are made accessible through the internet, providing worldwide access to television’s and film’s history.
Researchers working with online (audiovisual) archives find a wealth of online digital materials. However, to understand such sources, researchers largely depend on metadata, usually provided by the content provider (archives, broadcasters), often in an incomplete and inconsistent manner. At the same time, separated from their original context within a programme, film, or practice, archival material becomes detached from its original meaning creating environment, and may be taken up in a new setting by the researcher, giving it a novel, or additional, meaning. Thus, the use and re-use of archival material by researchers provides opportunities for confirmation as well as resistance to the original, to its context, and its meaning. Re-contextualization opens spaces for reinterpretation, for renewed understanding, and for alternative readings.

A panel on Visual Culture working group is proposed here to create a stage for the discussion of the use of online audiovisual archives in research. It may include but is not limited to:

  • theories of the digital archive:
  • on forming collections
  • the role of metadata for research
  • researchers as metadata creators
  • ethical issues of metadata creation and publication
  • sustainability of the online archive
  • collaboration between public and private bodies
  • the need for interdisciplinary work
  • ontology and epistemology of the digital
  • ethics of digital research
  • methods and tools for searching, researching, and analysing digital sources:
  • epistemologies of research tools
  • various uses of tools (black box vs critical)
  • challenges of access to online audiovisual archives or archival material
  • research practices:
  • use of online audiovisual archives as sources of primary material
  • challenges of using and re-using digital audiovisual sources (remix, mash-ups)
  • publications: academic videos / online publications
  • research projects
  • digital audiovidual collections and their management and maintenance

Audiovisual history online
On the use of online audiovisual archives in scholarship
Call for proposals
IAMCR 2015 – panel Visual Culture working group

IAMCR

The International Association for Media and Communication Research (IAMCR) is a worldwide professional organisation in the field of media and communication research. Its members promote global inclusiveness and excellence within the best traditions of critical scholarship in the field.
In line with the CfP of IAMCR’s Visual Culture working group, only abstracts in English will be accepted. However, presentations and sessions in English, French or Spanish will be facilitated.

Proposal submission

Proposals for this panel of up to 200 words are welcome and can be submitted to w.sanders@uu.nl. The deadline for submission is Friday 16 January 2015.

Queries about this call for proposals can be addressed to:
Willemien Sanders, PhD, Utrecht University, w.sanders@uu.nl
Berber Hagedoorn, MA, Utrecht University, b.hagedoorn@uu.nl
Liliana Melgar E., MA, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, lilimelgar@gmail.com

 

Relevant websites:
www.iamcr.org
http://iamcr.org/s-wg/working-group/visual-culture
http://congresiamcr.uqam.ca

Funded by: Connected to: