About EUscreen

Who is behind EUscreen?

What is EUscreenXL?

Why are there no clips from my country?

What are the aims of EUscreen?

What are the audio-visual items on EUscreen?

How can I use this material?

How have these clips and programmes been selected?

What is metadata?

Who is behind EUscreen?

EUscreen is made up of a consortium that includes broadcasters and archives, university television historians, technologists, designers and educators. EUscreen started in October 2009 as a three-year project funded by the European Commission’s eContentplus programme. Over the project’s duration more than 40.000 videos, photographs and articles representing Europe’s television heritage have been made available online through a freely accessible multilingual portal. The portal was launched in 2011 and it is directly connected to Europeana, a single access point to millions of books, paintings, films, museum objects and archival records that have been digitised throughout Europe.

What is EUscreenXL?

EUscreenXL is a project and best practice network which aims at improving and developing the EUscreen portal. It is a consortium involving European audiovisual and broadcasting archives. EUscreenXL aligns audiovisual collections held throughout Europe and connects them within the audiovisual domain of Europeana, an online collection of millions of digitised items from European museums, libraries and archives.

Why are there no clips from my country?

The EUscreen project consists of a group of organisations and archives who agreed to work together on providing access to their materials. If you know of an audiovisual archive that might be interested to work with us, do not hesitate to get in touch.

What are the aims of EUscreen?

  • To allow viewers and members of the public to see clips and programmes that have often been locked away in the archive for years.
  • To allow members of the public to revisit their own histories from across Europe as it was transmitted into their homes through their television sets.
  • To allow members of the public to appreciate the richness and diversity of television culture across Europe.
  • Help broadcasters and other audio-visual archives open their archives to wider audiences.
  • Help educators, specialist scholars, researchers and media professionals to find and understand audio-visual content from across Europe.
  • Provide audio-visual content to Europeana, a single access point to millions of books, paintings, films, museum objects and archival records that have been digitised throughout Europe.

What are the audio-visual items on EUscreen?

Television clips and programmes from broadcasters and broadcast archives from across Europe from the second half of the Twentieth Century, including film clips and newsreels from earlier decades and documents related to television history. All clips, photographs, documents and programmes have been hand-picked by experienced archivists and researchers who work at the broadcasters and archives.

How can I use this material?

At this time it is not possible to download clips or programmes because of the complicated rights restrictions that broadcasters and archives are subject to in each country. If you want to find out more about a particular item – for example, if you are a professional researcher and you want to buy or use the clip for use in a programme – then click on the ‘envelope’ icon which opens a contact form.

How have these clips and programmes been selected?

Most of the clips and programmes have been selected from a list of historical topics that aim to provide an insight into the social, cultural, political and economic developments and events that have taken place in the second half of the Twentieth Century.

As some partners began broadcasting later than others – and as different archiving policies and recording technologies have influenced what has been kept and preserved over the years – the EUscreen broadcasters and archives have responded to the historical topics in different ways. This is why, in some topics, there are sometimes more clips from some partners than others.

A large number of clips and programmes have been selected by the broadcasters and archives themselves to showcase their own strengths and interests – and many of these clips and programmes have been included in a number of specially devised virtual exhibitions.

What is metadata?

Special care has been given to provide each item with detailed descriptions and background information in different languages, to ensure that you can see where the item comes from and learn more about the people who created them. Click the arrow to see more technical and descriptive details. The information that has been provided for each item was standardised in line with the EBUcore standard for metadata from the European Broadcasting Union.

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