VIEW Journal issue on “Convergent Television(s)” now available

VIEW Issue on Convergent Television(s) In March, we published the call for papers for the sixth issue of our open access journal VIEW, which explores Europe’s television history and culture. At the end of December, this latest issue found its way online and it is now available in its entirety at http://journal.euscreen.eu. All articles can be read on screen, where source materials can be found embedded in the article text, or saved as a PDF for reading offline.

The sixth issue is co-edited by Gabriele Balbi, Assistant Professor in Media Studies at the Università della Svizzera italiana, and Massimo Scaglioni, Assistant Professor of Media History at the Catholic University of Milan.

The history of media convergence, especially of convergent television, is a field that needed further investigation. Media convergence is often considered a taken-for-granted phenomenon, a kind of ‘irresistible’ force that has changed and is continuously changing media ecosystems. Furthermore, it seems to be mainly an American phenomenon because it has involved US politics and companies and because the most relevant reflections and publications on this topic come from American scholars.

This issue of VIEW tries to deal with this complex and polysemic concept from different points of view, adopting several theoretical and methodological frameworks. It attempts to counteract some of the aforementioned taken-for-granted ideas, analyzing TV convergence from a historical and long-term perspective, considering symmetrical case studies of success and failures, concentrating on the European dimension through the lens of transnational, comparative, and national contributions.

Table of Contents

  • Editorial – Gabriele Balbi, Massimo Scaglioni

Discoveries

Explorations

Publishing info

VIEW is published by the Netherlands Institute for Sound and Vision in collaboration with Utrecht University, University of Luxembourg and Royal Holloway University of London. It is supported by the EUscreenXL project, the European Television History Network and the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research.

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