EXTENDED DEADLINE: “Archive-Based Productions” Call for Papers

VIEW Journal for European Television History and Culture Vol. 4 Issue 08

*** Extended deadline: February 10, 2015 ***

icoon.icoIn 1927, when Esfir Schub released her commissioned film The fall of the Romanov Dynasty to commemorate the 10th anniversary of the October Revolution, she hardly knew that her extensive use of film footage and newsreels of the event would mark the invention of a new ‘genre’: the archive based production or compilation genre. Television has adopted this genre, but audiovisual archives have fuelled a wide array of programmes and genres beyond compilation productions.

Government, business, broadcast and film archives as well as amateur collections and home videos are commonly used to spark memories and re-enact events from the past in various contexts. They are made widely accessible and re-used in traditional broadcast productions or given a second life in digital environments through online circulation.

 

This issue of VIEW invites scholars, archivists, producers and other practitioners to consider, highlight and elaborate on the use and re-use of moving image archives in media productions (for cinema, television, web, etc.). Contributions are welcome in the form of (short) articles or video essays.

 

Proposals are invited to explore (but not limited to) the following topics and questions:

  • Has the digital environment created a paradigm shift in the use of audiovisual archival materials?
  • The authenticity of audiovisual archives in the digital environment;
  • In what ways can audiovisual archives transform our relationship to the past? What is the role of archives in helping us reconnect with or understand the past? How do national/organisational archive policies impact or limit the histories that are informed by these archives?
  • The audio-visual archive as proof, testimony or document of reality, as shared heritage or collective memory;
  • Case studies using moving images as historical sources;
  • The use of archives in creative productions;
  • Ahistoricism in the use of audiovisual archival materials;
  • Found footage in moving image productions;
  • Compilation programmes studied through issues of representation, distribution, production, reception, etc;
  • Various formats and subgenres of compilation programmes: biographies, historical productions, art forms, etc;
  • Comparative studies of the compilation genre;
  • The search for identity in audiovisual archive collections;
  • The use of national audiovisual collections in a European or international context.

Practical

  • Contributions are encouraged from authors with different kinds of expertise and interests in television and media history.
  • Paper proposals (max. 500 words) are due on January 31st, 2015. Extended deadline: February 10, 2015
  • Submissions should be sent to the managing editor of the journal, Dana Mustata (journal@euscreen.eu). A notice of acceptance will be sent to authors in the 3rd week of February
  • Articles (2 – 4,000 words) will be due on May 15th 2015.
  • For further information or questions about the issue, please contact the co-editors: Mette Charis Buchman (mch@dr.dk) and Claude Mussou (cmussou@ina.fr)

 

See www.viewjournal.eu for the current and back issues. VIEW is proud to be an open access journal. All articles are made findable through the DOAJ and EBSCO databases.

 

Photo credits: Felix Janssens CC BY-SA

 

VIEW Journal Call for Papers: Archaeologies of Tele-Visions and -Realities

Over the last decade the label “media archaeology” has brought together a growing number of heterogeneous scholarship investigating new forms of historical research and narratives. While the field resists a coherent methodology, media archaeological explorations are generally characterized by their refusal of linear periodization, an emphasis on disregarded objects and historical episodes, and a playful approach of media as hybrid, non-fixed, and unstable material, cultural, discursive and imaginary artifacts.

Photo credit: Michael Shaheen (CC ND-NC)Archaeologies of Tele-Visions and -Realities

This issue of VIEW Journal of European Television History and Culture invites archeological inquiries into the multiple pasts of tele-visions. Since late nineteenth century imaginations of “seeing by electricity”, the phenomenon of “seeing at a distance” has known multiple futures and pasts, deaths and revivals. The aim of this issue is to assess the many lives of television in its different technological stages (electro-mechanical, electrical, electronic and digital) and to highlight the complexity practices, programs and discourses that have shaped television as a technical infrastructure, political and social institution, cultural phenomenon and business model from both diachronic and synchronic perspectives.

The theme of the 7th issue of VIEW (Vol. 4, spring 2015) seeks to shine a light on the multiple histories of television and welcomes contributions that propose archeological excavations from different disciplinary and thematic points of view.

Untold Histories and Forgotten Practices

Proposals are invited on (but not limited to):

  • Object biographies and hybrid technologies: description of obsolete or forgotten technologies and/or apparatuses; hybridity of emerging audio/visual technologies;
  • Archaeology of TV spectatorship: problematizing historical audiences of television beyond domestic consumption;
  • Politics of television: gendering TV before its integration of domestic space; archeology of television’s military uses; shaping television as a consumer object;
  • Questioning televisual paradigms: liveness, simultaneity, ubiquity, participation, etc.
  • Symbolic engineering: imagined and configured uses in both fictional and factional sources
  • Archaeology of televisual programs and formats: intermedial links of early televisual texts;
  • Experimental media archaeology: reenactments and reconstitutions of television technologies and practices;
  • Non-conformist histories of tv: histories of guerilla TV, non-profit and educational television.
  • Archaeology of digital television: histories of televisual participation and interactivity;

Practical

Contributions are encouraged from authors with different expertise and interests in television and media history.

Paper proposals (max. 500 words) are due on November 30th, 2014. Submissions should be sent to the managing editor of the journal, Dana Mustata (journal@euscreen.eu). A notice of acceptance will be send to authors on third week of December. Articles (2-4,000 words) will be due on March 1st, 2015.

For further information or questions about the issue, please contact the co-editors: Andreas Fickers (andreas.fickers@uni.lu) and Anne-Katrin Weber (anne-katrin.weber@unil.ch)

See www.viewjournal.eu for the current and back issues. VIEW is proud to be an open access journal. All articles are made findable through the DOAJ and EBSCO databases.

Photo credit: Michael Shaheen (CC ND-NC)

International Journal of Digital Television issue 5.1 now available

The issue 5.1 of the peer review International Journal of Digital Television is now out and you can access it here . The journal aims to describe and explain the transition to digital TV and address the social and cultural questions surrounding the future of television beyond switchover. Content is broad and varied, ranging from a mixture of critical work on technological, industry and regulatory convergence, to the emerging wider socio-cultural and political questions such as audience behaviour, plurality of TV channels and television influence.

journalIn the current issue you can read articles from Toby Miller, Terry Flew, S. Papathanassopoulos, conference reports by I. Katsirea and Darcy Gerbarg, three book reviews, a special theme on ‘Private TV in Europe’ guest edited by Karen Donders and Caroline Pauwels with contributions from Maria Michalis, Tom Evens, Nele Simons and others.

You are all welcome to send ideas for full articles (6-6,500 words), short commentaries (1,500-2,000 words) and conference reports to be considered in the journal to Professor Petros Iosifidis (Department of Sociology, City University London), P.Iosifidis@city.ac.uk. The deadline for submitting them for issue 5.2 is end-June 2014 and for issue 5.3 mid-October 2014.

Potential issues to be addressed in future include, among others: the extent to which new media developments and changing media consumption require changes in regulatory philosophy and business practice; the extent to which globalisation, privatisation and deregulation alter the creative freedom and public accountability of media enterprises; whether digital TV actually increases choice and diversity or just offers more of the same and/or recycled programmes; concentration of media ownership and its effect on pluralism and diversity; national debates about the role of public service broadcasting in the digital epoch; comparative analyses of global TV formats; television for children; sports programming and televised sports rights.

Scope: An Online Journal of Film and Television Studies issue 26 now published

scopeScope is a fully peer-reviewed online journal edited by staff and students in the Department of Culture, Film and Media and Institute for Screen Industries Research at the University of Nottingham. Scope provides a forum for discussion of all aspects of film and television history, theory and criticism.

Scope: An Online Journal of Film and Television Studies issue 26 has been recently published.  The open-access resource is available here:  http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/scope/february-issue-26.aspx

 

 

Call for Papers for the Special issue of Critical Studies in Television

Arts & Humanities Research Council (AHRC) invites proposals for articles for a special issue of Critical Studies in Television:‘ Spaces of Television: Production, Site and Style’ to be published in Autumn 2015.

Critical studies in televisionThe journal issue emerges from a research project of the same name, investigating television fiction produced in the UK from 1955-94 and analysing how the material spaces of production (in TV studios and on location) conditioned the aesthetic forms of programmes. Papers that specifically address British drama during this period are particularly welcome, however comparative perspectives concerning dramas from other television industries, import/export, transnational exchange, co-productions and spatially-themed studies of earlier or later dramas will be also considered.

Possible topics include but are not limited to:

  • Analysis of the dramatic conventions of television genres as demonstrated through the use of space and mise-en-scene.
  • Case studies of television dramatists, actors, directors, producers, designers, or other production staff focusing on mise-en-scene and issues of space.
  • The relationship between television dramatic space and performance, and the social and cultural meanings of performance in different spatial and aesthetic contexts.
  • The spatial significance of particular production techniques and/or special effects in television drama.
  • The social and cultural meanings of the spaces depicted in television drama: e.g. heritage spaces, the urban and the rural, regional, national and foreign spaces, fantasy spaces.
  • The institutional and aesthetic relationships between the spaces of television production (studio, location) and dramas’ social, political and cultural meanings.
  • Histories and historiographies of television drama, particularly relating to production strategies and institutional contexts.

Proposals for articles of 5,000-6,000 words, in the form of an abstract of approximately 400-500 words should be submitted to Dr Leah Panos (l.d.panos@reading.ac.uk) by 31 March 2014.

Further details of the project can be found at:
http://www.reading.ac.uk/ftt/research/Spacesoftelevision.aspx

Call for Papers: Television Histories in (Post)Socialist Europe

VIEW Journal of European Television History and Culture Vol. 3, Issue 05.

Deadline for abstracts: February 1st, 2014.
Deadline for full papers: 15 March, 2014.

While recent comparative and transnational approaches in the field of European television history have demonstrated the need for (post)socialist television histories in Europe, there is currently limited scholarship dedicated to this geopolitical area of television in Europe. This area of study has mostly been relegated to the margins of other disciplines and remained isolated by national languages inaccessible to non-native scholars.

VIEW Journal logoThe forthcoming issue of VIEW Journal of European Television History and Culture is dedicated to the theme Television Histories in (Post)Socialist Europe. It aims to open up discussions of (post)socialist television in Europe beyond political histories of the nation-state, discourses of Cold War isolation and East-West antagonism. The very broad questions that motivate these aims are:

  • Which empirical case studies help us understand (post)socialist television histories beyond stories of political control?
  • Which primary sources allow us access to television histories that fall outside the mainstream histories of the socialist state?
  • What methods do we need in order to decentralize the state in the production of (post)socialist television histories and analyze television histories that have resisted, subverted or negotiated the politics of communist regimes?
  • How can we theorize (post)socialist television as an object of study that revisits the East versus West dichotomies that have been at the centre of television history in Europe
  • How do (post)socialist television histories help us revisit the Cold War geography of Europe?
  • How can we understand the shifting place of (post)socialist television within broader societal processes of communication?

VIEW welcomes contributions in the form of short articles (2000-4500 words), video and audio essays that take these broad questions on board and deal specifically with topics such as:

  • empirical case studies that help us understand (post)socialist television histories beyond stories of political control;
  • video and audio essays exploring television archival collections in Eastern Europe;
  • video and audio essays presenting primary sources (e.g. oral interviews, audio-visual and written material) of television in former socialist countries;
  • transnational cultures of (post)socialist television in Europe, namely: shared cultures of television production and professions, shared techno-political cultures of television and shared viewing cultures;
  • memories of socialist television and nostalgia;
  • popular television programmes during and since socialism.

This issue is guest edited by the European (Post)Socialist Television History Network in collaboration with the following guest editorial team:

  • Kirsten Bönker (Bielefeld University, DE)
  • Sven Grampp (Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, DE)
  • Ferenc Hammer (ELTE University, HU)
  • Anikó Imre (University of Southern California, USA)
  • Lars Lundgren (Södertörn Univerity, SE)
  • Sabina Mihelj (Loughborough University, UK)
  • Dana Mustata (University of Groningen, NL)
  • Julia Obertreis (Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, DE)
  • Irena Reifová (Charles University, CZ)

Submission info

  • Contributions are encouraged from authors with different kinds of expertise and interests in television broadcasting, from researchers to television professionals, to archivists and preservationists.
  • Contributions can be in the form of conventional articles, illustrated commentaries or photo-essays.
  • Paper proposals (max. 500 words) are due on February 1st, 2014. Submissions should be sent to the managing editor of the journal, Dana Mustata.

VIEW is published by the Netherlands Institute for Sound and Vision in collaboration with Utrecht University, University of Luxembourg and Royal Holloway University of London. It is supported by the EUscreenXL project, the European Television History Network and the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research.

EUscreenXL presents issue 04 of VIEW Journal

VIEW Journal of European Television History and Culture Vol. 2, Issue 04: The Hidden Professions of Television

VIEW Journal cover issue 04

We know little about the ‘behind the scenes’ of television. The fourth issue of VIEW provides a rich and eclectic series of contributions from which a lot can be learnt about its ‘hidden’ professions.

VIEW, the Journal of European Television History and Culture is the first peer-reviewed, multi-media and open access e-journal in the field of
European television history and culture. It offers an international platform for outstanding academic research and archival reflection on television as an important part of our European cultural heritage.

The journal is proud to present its fourth issue:
Hidden Professions of Television has been guest-edited by Andy O’Dwyer and Tim O’Sulivan and is freely available from: http://www.viewjournal.eu

The articles presented here bring under scrutiny the ‘behind the scenes’ activities of television and their hidden, often unrecognised and uncelebrated personnel and processes. They engage across a wide range of organisational, administrative and technical activities that have played their understated, often ‘invisible’ part in the historical formation and development of television. We wish you a pleasant and inspiring journey through the Hidden Professions of Television!

Table of Contents

 

  • Editorial – Andy O’Dwyer, Tim O’Sulivan

DISCOVERIES

EXPLORATIONS

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