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FIAT/IFTA Announces Seminar on Television Documentary

The Third FIAT/IFTA Television Studies Seminar on Television Documentary
March 13th and 14th 2014

 

FIAT/IFTA TSC Logo

The FIAT/IFTA Television Studies Commission will organise a two-day seminar, entirely devoted to Television Documentary, hosted by the Netherlands Institute for Sound and Vision at Hilversum.

On the first day 13th March 2014, former and current practitioners will discuss their work in a witness seminar and extracts from their work will be screened.

The second day will be open for presentations of scholarly work on any aspect of television documentary, its history, practice, and aesthetics. Comparative studies are particularly welcome. Scholars are invited to send in their 250-word abstracts and a short biography by December 1st, 2013.

The Seminar language will be English. We are asking participating FIAT/IFTA member archives to provide research facilities and extracts free of charge to candidates whose abstracts are selected.

Initial enquiries should be made to the appropriate member of the Television Studies Commission and completed proposals sent to the same person by 1st December 2013.

The Television Studies Commission members and the areas they are responsible for are:

  • For participants from the UK: Steve Bryant, BFI (steve.bryant@bfi.org.uk)
  • For participants from France and other French-speaking countries: Claude Mussou, INA (cmussou@ina.fr)
  • For Dutch/Flemish speakers: Bert Hogenkamp, Beeld en Geluid (bhogenkamp@beeldengeluid.nl)
  • For US participants: Mike Mashon, Library of Congress (mima@loc.gov)
  • For Central and Eastern European participants and members of the European History Television Network: Dana Mustata, University of Groningen (d.mustata@rug.nl)
  • For Irish participants: Liam Wylie, RTE (Liam.Wylie@rte.ie)
  • For all other potential participants, send your proposals to Andy O’Dwyer, BBC (andy.odwyer@bbc.co.uk).

TV3 in focus on Critical Studies in Television

Image by Turisme de Subirats

The ‘Featured Archive’ series on Critical Studies in Television focuses  on a different television archive each month. Its latest installment turns the spotlights on a EUscreen partner from Catalonia: broadcaster TV3.

Director of TV3’s Documentation Department Alícia Conesa and Montse Fortino both hold degrees in librarianship and have a broad experience working at the Catalan public television broadcaster Televisió de Catalunya (TV3). In the CST article, they provide an intriguing insight into TV3’s broadcast history, mission and archive material.

Read the article at http://cstonline.tv/tv3-catalunya to find out more about TV3’s societal function, digital archive and its effort to promote the use of the Catalan language. Moreover, view the Tricicle Theater company’s look at the world of sports for a guaranteed world of genuine Catalan pleasure.

For the full list of Featured Archives, visit: http://www.cstonline.tv/category/featured-archives

Researching Film and Television Through the Archive

The National Film and Sound Archive's collection contains approximately 1.7 million collection items.

The one-day multi-disciplinary symposium Researching Film and Television Through the Archive, jointly hosted on November 9th 2012 by University of Warwick’s Department of Film and Television Studies and the Institute of Advanced Study, will explore the practices and implications of researching film and television through the archive.

Making the archive the basis of a project or incorporating archival research into an existing project can be an insightful, rewarding, and frequently also a frustrating experience. The symposium will offer a space for archival researchers from across disciplines to share practices, methodologies and experiences of using different types of archives to research film and television texts, contexts and histories.

Call for Contributions

Abstracts are invited for contributions that seek to further understand the possibilities and boundaries of conducting archival research. Contributions can take the form of a 20 minute paper – outlining research ideas related to the themes of the symposium – or a 10 minute presentation – discussing the practical, methodological or scholarly implications of using archival research as an aspect of film and television research.

Contributions are particularly welcome in the following areas:

  • Archival research methodologies
  • Why do archival research?
  • The allure of the archive
  • Practical aspects of using archives
  • Archiving policy and practice
  • The possibilities of the archive
  • The limits and limitations of archival research
  • The archive, impact and the REF

Abstracts (max 200 words), along with a short biographical note and a specification of the type of contribution you wish to make, are due by Monday October 8th 2012. Please send your abstract to Richard.wallace@warwick.ac.uk .

 

Over 13 millions records relating to film, television and radio accessed via pioneering search environment

British Universities Film & Video Council Media Release 

An innovative ‘all-in-one’ search engine allowing users to access nine online databases, containing more than 13 million records, relating to film, television and radio content has been launched on June 16 by Royal Holloway, University of London (RHUL) and the British Universities Film & Video Council (BUFVC). 

The BUFVC federated search environment will allow researchers to search all collections from a single entry point and easily view collated results through a clean design and user-friendly icons.  The interactive online research tools offer ‘human-friendly’ result filters, intelligently generated ‘related records & searches’, and have a detailed user history and export function.

Increasing quantities of archive film, television and radio content are available, but the content is usually delivered as stand-alone collections, with users needing to know where to look before they begin their research.  The BUFVC federated search environment will transform moving image and sound resource discovery by replacing the need for researchers to locate and access various databases and collections through multiple channels. 

The BUFVC federated search environment benefited from extensive user testing by researchers, teaching support staff, librarians and academics. The multi-purpose search engine and interface will be released under an open source licence this summer.

The BUFVC federated search environment is the result of a collaborative project between the British Universities Film & Video Council (BUFVC) and Royal Holloway, University of London.  The research project was funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) under the Digital Equipment and Database enhancement for Impact programme.

The BUFVC federated search environment can be found at http://beta.bufvc.ac.uk/

PrestoCentre Training Course 2011: Long-Term Audiovisual Digital Preservation. Strategy, Planning and Tools

Press release by PrestoCentre

From 12-16 September in Paris and Bry-sur-Marne, France, PrestoCentre organises as part of its Professional Development Training Series a course in “Long-Term Audiovisual Digital Preservation: Strategy, Planning & Tools”. Participants in the course include large audiovisual archives, service providers and technology providers.

Training Course Summary
The audiovisual (AV) record of the 20th century is at risk, with digitisation being a solution, but this created a new problem: the preservation of digital AV content. Managers and technical staff of the AV industry need to be knowledgeable of, and understand how to use, the latest digital preservation technologies, in order to procure the safety of these documents of cultural heritage. Based on the experiences of some of the largest audiovisual and broadcast archives in Europe, this training will give a complete account of the tools and technologies available for the digital preservation of, and access to, audiovisual content, outlining strategies, workflows and architecture planning. In addition, the training provides a range of informative visits to a variety of relevant sites.

Course Topics
Strategy; preservation planning; OAIS; workflow; architecture; mass storage; formats; encoding; compression; metadata; preservation metadata; quality control; service management; risk management; rights management; partnerships; state of the art; support mechanisms; future developments.

More Information and Registration
Visit http://training2011.prestocentre.eu for programme, background and more information. Registration is limited to 40 delegates, so click here to register now.

About PrestoCentre
PrestoCentre brings together a community of stakeholders in audiovisual digitisation and digital preservation to share, work and learn. PrestoCentre helps custodians and creators of audiovisual content make the most of their digital archives through advocacy, information creation, knowledge leveraging, and valuable practical workshops. Using free tools and simple strategies PrestoCentre saves you money and time whilst improving long-term access to your digital audiovisual collections. PrestoCentre does this by helping you share your experiences and learn from best practices.

ERT becomes an associate partner in EUscreen

Ellinikí Radiofonía Tileórasi (ERT), the Greek state broadcasting company has committed itself to EUscreen by becoming an associate partner. The audiovisual archive of ERT will contribute some of their rich content from Greek television. ERT is the second content provider from Greece, the other one, the Hellenic National Audiovisual Archive is a consortium partner of EUscreen. Together they provide access to the audiovisual treasures of Greece.

EUscreen publishes its first Online Access to Audiovisual Heritage Status Report

Press release

Increasing access to digitised audiovisual heritage in particular and cultural heritage in general, has become an important topic for institutions in the field of cultural heritage, policy-makers, national governments and the European Commission. This report, written by Wietske van den Heuvel and Lotte Belice Baltussen focuses on access to audiovisual heritage in general and specifically, access in an educational setting.

The report consists of two parts. Part one outlines the general status of online access to audiovisual heritage and focuses on creating a business model for platforms with audiovisual content and on the value proposition of audiovisual content. Additionally, an overview of revenue models with examples is provided. Part two describes the access to online audiovisual heritage from an educational perspective and contains an inventory of educational platforms and a methodology for the analysis of these platforms. A selected set of platforms is analysed and the results are used to outline the specific value propositions for education. Occurring revenue models in the educational field are analysed and alternatives are presented.

The full report can be accessed here.

BBC Research & Development launched Musical Moods sound experiment at National Science & Engineering Week 2011

Press release by the BBC

As part of National Science & Engineering Week and BBC Research & Development’s Multimedia Classification project, BBC R&D, the British Science Association and the University of Salford launched the Musical Moods research project.

To help produce a new way of classifying decades of programmes within the BBC digital archive, the BBC is conducting a pioneering online experiment asking the general public about the moods they associate with a range of past and present TV theme tunes.

In this experiment members of the public were asked to rate the moods of TV theme tunes from the BBC archive. Through these ratings, the BBC hopes to be able to identify the particular moods portrayed by the theme tunes.

Once the data is collected, they can then train computers to analyse different TV theme tunes throughout the archive and automatically determine what emotions and moods they convey.

It is hoped that the results from this online experiment will assist in the creation of an entirely novel method of classifying online content. This would allow users to browse and search the archives based on what is happening in the programme, rather than by using factual descriptions manually added.

An experiment to collect this type of data has never been conducted on this scale before; it is expected that the results will be of considerable interest to many parties so the data will be published in the public domain.

By listening to five randomly selected clips of TV theme tunes, listeners will be asked questions such as:

  • What is the mood of the theme tune?
  • What genre of TV programme is the theme tune from?
  • Are you familiar with the tune? or Do you like the theme tune?

Acoustic Engineer Trevor Cox from the University of Salford said: “As the pubic enjoy themselves on the website, they will be helping us answer some really interesting research questions such as how well theme tunes portray the mood of a TV or radio programme.

“There has been surprisingly little research into this. As well as helping us to understand theme music better, the public will give us vital data which will allow us to train computer programmes to identify the mood of theme music automatically.”

Sam Davies, Research Engineer from BBC R&D, said: “The BBC Archive records the BBC’s output over the past 80 years, in the form of TV and radio programmes, news reports, written documentation, sound effects, images, and programme listings. It’s a rich record of recent British history, society, and the relationship between the corporation and the public that pay for it.

“However, making the rich content available and accessible online is a difficult challenge. The Musical Moods experiment breaks new ground by examining how theme music might be used to make it easier to find material in the archive.”

Roland Jackson, Chief Executive of the British Science Association said: “National Science & Engineering Week is all about engaging as many people as possible with the sciences and engineering.

“Projects like Musical Moods offer a fun and accessible way for the public to become part of the science that makes the UK a world leader in the field.”

Music has long been used within television and film to heighten and develop the mood of the content, or to help set the intended programme’s tone.

Research suggests there are between 8 and 10 different types of mood that music can portray and the music before a film or TV programme can change our perceived mood of that film.

As little research has been conducted in theme tunes, a variety of theme tunes from across the breadth of the BBC Archive is selected, across both musical and TV genres for this experiment. Listeners will hear a range of tunes from across the BBC Archive and might find themselves taking a trip down memory lane!

EUscreen welcomes a new associate partner

The EUscreen consortium is being expanded with the Nasjonalbiblioteket from Norway. With Norway included, 20 European countries are contributing to the EUscreen project. The Nasjonalbiblioteket has a collection of manuscripts, special collections of books, music, radio and TV programmes, film , theatre, maps, posters, pictures, photographs and newspapers that reflect the Norwegian culture. For EUscreen, they will provide content related to Norwegian television.

The EUscreen project is always interested in a possible cooperation with audiovisual archives and other cultural institutions. If your institution is interested, please contact EUscreen.

Film Heritage, Digital Future: Practice and Sustainability for the Film Archive Sector

Press release by the BUFVC

A one day event for professionals in film and TV archiving.
Friday March 4th 2011
Organised and hosted by Birmingham Centre for Media and Cultural Research
Birmingham City University
Margaret St Campus

What issues are facing film and other audio-visual archives? What are the immediate challenges for archive holders of cuts to public funding and threats to intellectual property in a digital age? How is our film heritage to be sustained and used? What kinds of collaborations might support the legacy of UK film and prompt innovation and best practice?

This event offers an opportunity for those with a professional interest in the film sector to hear about best practice in a range of public-funded projects and to share insights and ideas about the challenges for the audio-visual archive sector in the digital age.

The event will be anchored by the presentation of a range of innovative projects funded by Screen West Midlands under the Digital Film Archive Fund. Since the launch of the fund by Film Council in 2009, these projects have created new archival material, investigated and repurposed existing material, reaching new audiences and prompting engagement with archive issues and cultural heritage. As the projects seek to secure their legacy, develop and expand their scope, the issues they face will provide a prompt for discussion.

The event will feature contributions from BBC, SWM, MACE, EUscreen, workers from a variety of archives and from the education sector. EUscreen will be represented by Dr. Rob Turnock and Sian Barber, postdoctoral researcher both from Royal Holloway, University of London. They will be presenting their paper “From archive to online user: EUscreen and the challenges of creating access to European television content.”

The programme of the event contains presentations, screenings, opportunities for networking and discussion of current challenges in the sector.

Refreshments and lunch are provided.

RSVP: paul.long@bcu.ac.uk

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