Call for Papers: 1968 in the Media

The Media Studies Commission of the International Federation of Television Archives announces its forthcoming international seminar to take place in Paris, on March 20th, 2017. The one-day seminar is dedicated to the media coverage of different political and social events that took place in 1968 across the globe. From the Prague Spring in the former Czechoslovakia to the student protests in Paris and civil rights movement in the United States, the protests of 1968 marked a series of national and transnational events that captured media’s attention.

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EXTENDED DEADLINE: VIEW Journal Call for Papers “History of Private and Commercial Television in Europe”

 

***Extended deadline: September 27, 2016***

The perception of the European television and media landscape has been traditionally shaped by the contrast and constant comparison with the American one: state-run stations or public service broadcasting in Europe vs. commercial networks in the US. However, in most European countries it took to the last third of the 20th century, until commercial TV got proper permission, or started its activities. As a result, to date, the structure is characterized by coexistence of public service and commercial stations (in a mixed system only later opened to pay and over-the-top operators). ( Read more…)

BAAC Annual Conference 2016 | Audiovisual Heritage and People: Connecting, Curating, Sharing

 

The 13th BAAC annual conference will be held from November 2nd to 3rd this year in Vilnius, Lithuania, on the premises of the Arts Printing House – the building of a former printing house dating back to the 16th century. The conference will be hosted by the Lithuanian Central State Archive and Archivists’ Association. BAAC invites presentation proposals, which can be submitted until 10 June 2016. The BAAC conference will be followed by the second international Europeana Sounds conference, “Unlocking Sound Collections”, which will be held on November 4th this year at Vilnius University. ( Read more…)

VIEW Journal Call for Papers on “Non-Fiction Transmedia”

Image credit:  Catalina Acelas

 

VIEW Journal of European Television History and Culture, our peer-reviewed multi-media and open access e-journal in the field of television studies, devotes its 10th issue (Winter 2016) to Non-fiction Transmedia.

With this issue we aim to offer a scholarly perspective on the emergence of transmedia forms, their technological and aesthetic characteristics, the types of audience engagement they engender, the possibilities they create for engagement with archival content, the technological predecessors that they may or may not have emerged from, and the institutional and creative milieux in which they thrive (or don’t thrive). We welcome contributions from all perspectives including but not restricted to aesthetic, sociological, industrial, media archaeological, and audience/reception studies perspectives.

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VIEW Journal Call for Papers: TV Formats and Format Research

Author: Erwin Verbruggen

 

UPDATE: Deadline extended to 14 September 2015.

VIEW Journal of European Television History and Culture, the first peer-reviewed multi-media e-journal in the field of television studies, devotes its 9th issue (Spring 2016) to TV Formats and Format Research: Theory, methodology, history and new developments. This special issue of VIEW seeks to build on existing format scholarship and deepen our understanding of the history and continuing growth of the TV format business from a European perspective.

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EXTENDED DEADLINE: “Archive-Based Productions” Call for Papers

VIEW Journal for European Television History and Culture Vol. 4 Issue 08

*** Extended deadline: February 10, 2015 ***

icoon.icoIn 1927, when Esfir Schub released her commissioned film The fall of the Romanov Dynasty to commemorate the 10th anniversary of the October Revolution, she hardly knew that her extensive use of film footage and newsreels of the event would mark the invention of a new ‘genre’: the archive based production or compilation genre. Television has adopted this genre, but audiovisual archives have fuelled a wide array of programmes and genres beyond compilation productions.

Government, business, broadcast and film archives as well as amateur collections and home videos are commonly used to spark memories and re-enact events from the past in various contexts. They are made widely accessible and re-used in traditional broadcast productions or given a second life in digital environments through online circulation.

 

This issue of VIEW invites scholars, archivists, producers and other practitioners to consider, highlight and elaborate on the use and re-use of moving image archives in media productions (for cinema, television, web, etc.). Contributions are welcome in the form of (short) articles or video essays.

 

Proposals are invited to explore (but not limited to) the following topics and questions:

  • Has the digital environment created a paradigm shift in the use of audiovisual archival materials?
  • The authenticity of audiovisual archives in the digital environment;
  • In what ways can audiovisual archives transform our relationship to the past? What is the role of archives in helping us reconnect with or understand the past? How do national/organisational archive policies impact or limit the histories that are informed by these archives?
  • The audio-visual archive as proof, testimony or document of reality, as shared heritage or collective memory;
  • Case studies using moving images as historical sources;
  • The use of archives in creative productions;
  • Ahistoricism in the use of audiovisual archival materials;
  • Found footage in moving image productions;
  • Compilation programmes studied through issues of representation, distribution, production, reception, etc;
  • Various formats and subgenres of compilation programmes: biographies, historical productions, art forms, etc;
  • Comparative studies of the compilation genre;
  • The search for identity in audiovisual archive collections;
  • The use of national audiovisual collections in a European or international context.

Practical

  • Contributions are encouraged from authors with different kinds of expertise and interests in television and media history.
  • Paper proposals (max. 500 words) are due on January 31st, 2015. Extended deadline: February 10, 2015
  • Submissions should be sent to the managing editor of the journal, Dana Mustata (journal@euscreen.eu). A notice of acceptance will be sent to authors in the 3rd week of February
  • Articles (2 – 4,000 words) will be due on May 15th 2015.
  • For further information or questions about the issue, please contact the co-editors: Mette Charis Buchman (mch@dr.dk) and Claude Mussou (cmussou@ina.fr)

 

See www.viewjournal.eu for the current and back issues. VIEW is proud to be an open access journal. All articles are made findable through the DOAJ and EBSCO databases.

 

Photo credits: Felix Janssens CC BY-SA

 

Audiovisual history online: On the use of online audiovisual archives in scholarship – Call for Papers for IAMCR 2015

IAMCRTelevision has, throughout its existence, been regarded as a window to the world as well as a reflection of national and regional identities and cultures. The art of film has left us with a wealth of works which contribute to our visual world heritage. Television and film archives provide rich collections of images, sounds, and artefacts related to television broadcasts, film screenings, and production practices of both. As with so many archival collections, archive items not digitally born are being digitized, and increasingly collections are made accessible through the internet, providing worldwide access to television’s and film’s history.
Researchers working with online (audiovisual) archives find a wealth of online digital materials. However, to understand such sources, researchers largely depend on metadata, usually provided by the content provider (archives, broadcasters), often in an incomplete and inconsistent manner. At the same time, separated from their original context within a programme, film, or practice, archival material becomes detached from its original meaning creating environment, and may be taken up in a new setting by the researcher, giving it a novel, or additional, meaning. Thus, the use and re-use of archival material by researchers provides opportunities for confirmation as well as resistance to the original, to its context, and its meaning. Re-contextualization opens spaces for reinterpretation, for renewed understanding, and for alternative readings.

A panel on Visual Culture working group is proposed here to create a stage for the discussion of the use of online audiovisual archives in research. It may include but is not limited to:

  • theories of the digital archive:
  • on forming collections
  • the role of metadata for research
  • researchers as metadata creators
  • ethical issues of metadata creation and publication
  • sustainability of the online archive
  • collaboration between public and private bodies
  • the need for interdisciplinary work
  • ontology and epistemology of the digital
  • ethics of digital research
  • methods and tools for searching, researching, and analysing digital sources:
  • epistemologies of research tools
  • various uses of tools (black box vs critical)
  • challenges of access to online audiovisual archives or archival material
  • research practices:
  • use of online audiovisual archives as sources of primary material
  • challenges of using and re-using digital audiovisual sources (remix, mash-ups)
  • publications: academic videos / online publications
  • research projects
  • digital audiovidual collections and their management and maintenance

Audiovisual history online
On the use of online audiovisual archives in scholarship
Call for proposals
IAMCR 2015 – panel Visual Culture working group

IAMCR

The International Association for Media and Communication Research (IAMCR) is a worldwide professional organisation in the field of media and communication research. Its members promote global inclusiveness and excellence within the best traditions of critical scholarship in the field.
In line with the CfP of IAMCR’s Visual Culture working group, only abstracts in English will be accepted. However, presentations and sessions in English, French or Spanish will be facilitated.

Proposal submission

Proposals for this panel of up to 200 words are welcome and can be submitted to w.sanders@uu.nl. The deadline for submission is Friday 16 January 2015.

Queries about this call for proposals can be addressed to:
Willemien Sanders, PhD, Utrecht University, w.sanders@uu.nl
Berber Hagedoorn, MA, Utrecht University, b.hagedoorn@uu.nl
Liliana Melgar E., MA, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, lilimelgar@gmail.com

 

Relevant websites:
www.iamcr.org
http://iamcr.org/s-wg/working-group/visual-culture
http://congresiamcr.uqam.ca

VIEW Journal Call for Papers: Archaeologies of Tele-Visions and -Realities

Over the last decade the label “media archaeology” has brought together a growing number of heterogeneous scholarship investigating new forms of historical research and narratives. While the field resists a coherent methodology, media archaeological explorations are generally characterized by their refusal of linear periodization, an emphasis on disregarded objects and historical episodes, and a playful approach of media as hybrid, non-fixed, and unstable material, cultural, discursive and imaginary artifacts.

Photo credit: Michael Shaheen (CC ND-NC)Archaeologies of Tele-Visions and -Realities

This issue of VIEW Journal of European Television History and Culture invites archeological inquiries into the multiple pasts of tele-visions. Since late nineteenth century imaginations of “seeing by electricity”, the phenomenon of “seeing at a distance” has known multiple futures and pasts, deaths and revivals. The aim of this issue is to assess the many lives of television in its different technological stages (electro-mechanical, electrical, electronic and digital) and to highlight the complexity practices, programs and discourses that have shaped television as a technical infrastructure, political and social institution, cultural phenomenon and business model from both diachronic and synchronic perspectives.

The theme of the 7th issue of VIEW (Vol. 4, spring 2015) seeks to shine a light on the multiple histories of television and welcomes contributions that propose archeological excavations from different disciplinary and thematic points of view.

Untold Histories and Forgotten Practices

Proposals are invited on (but not limited to):

  • Object biographies and hybrid technologies: description of obsolete or forgotten technologies and/or apparatuses; hybridity of emerging audio/visual technologies;
  • Archaeology of TV spectatorship: problematizing historical audiences of television beyond domestic consumption;
  • Politics of television: gendering TV before its integration of domestic space; archeology of television’s military uses; shaping television as a consumer object;
  • Questioning televisual paradigms: liveness, simultaneity, ubiquity, participation, etc.
  • Symbolic engineering: imagined and configured uses in both fictional and factional sources
  • Archaeology of televisual programs and formats: intermedial links of early televisual texts;
  • Experimental media archaeology: reenactments and reconstitutions of television technologies and practices;
  • Non-conformist histories of tv: histories of guerilla TV, non-profit and educational television.
  • Archaeology of digital television: histories of televisual participation and interactivity;

Practical

Contributions are encouraged from authors with different expertise and interests in television and media history.

Paper proposals (max. 500 words) are due on November 30th, 2014. Submissions should be sent to the managing editor of the journal, Dana Mustata (journal@euscreen.eu). A notice of acceptance will be send to authors on third week of December. Articles (2-4,000 words) will be due on March 1st, 2015.

For further information or questions about the issue, please contact the co-editors: Andreas Fickers (andreas.fickers@uni.lu) and Anne-Katrin Weber (anne-katrin.weber@unil.ch)

See www.viewjournal.eu for the current and back issues. VIEW is proud to be an open access journal. All articles are made findable through the DOAJ and EBSCO databases.

Photo credit: Michael Shaheen (CC ND-NC)

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