Conference Notes: Content in Motion | Curating Europe’s Audiovisual Heritage: Opening & Session 1

Author: Anna de Bruyn, Sian Barber
Copyright: National Library of Sweden

Opening & Session 1 | Session 2 | Session 3 | Session 4 | Session 5 & Closing Keynote

 
Thanks to everyone who attended the 2015 international EUscreenXL conference. We hope you had a great time with us in Warsaw!

In this series of blogposts we’re re-visiting the conference and bringing you the details you may have missed, or wish to refresh. This first article covers the opening talks by Michał Merczyński and Eggo Müller, as well as the presentations of Harry Verwayen on Europeana’s framework for measuring impact, Liam Wylie on curation and dissemination at RTÉ, and Alicja Knast on enriching exhibitions with the audiovisual.

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Join us at our annual conference Content in Motion: Curating Europe’s Audiovisual Heritage

Author: Maria Drabczyk

 

On December 3 and 4 in Warsaw at the National Audiovisual Institute (NInA) we will be holding an international conference on curation of audiovisual heritage. The full programme for the conference, titled Content in Motion: Curating Europe’s Audiovisual Heritage, is now available and the registration is still open. We look forward to seeing you in Warsaw!

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EUscreenXL Content Partners Workshop in Vilnius

Author: Yashar Dehaghani

Photo by Larisa Dmuchovskaja

On the 19th and 20th of March representatives from EUscreenXL’s content partners met at the Lithuanian Central State Archives (LCVA) in Vilnius with technical and research partners as well as Europeana to examine and address practical issues and opportunities relating to the supply, delivery, and re-use of content and metadata for the EUscreenXL project.

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Our First Physical Exhibition in the Freedom Express Campaign

Author: Maria Drabczyk

 

On the eve of the 25th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall, a unique exhibition entitled ‘Roads to 1989. East-Central Europe 1939-1989.’ was launched in the German capital. The exhibition documents the complicated process through which this part of Europe regained its freedom from communist dictatorship. The exhibition is part of ‘Freedom Express’, a social and educational campaign organised by ENRS, ministries responsible for culture in Poland, Germany, Hungary and Slovakia and local partners. EUscreenXL Consortium and Europeana are partners of the project.

DSC_9775The exhibition concentrates on the various ways in which civil liberties were limited in the former communist block and on attempts made to regain them. It focuses especially on the question of what connects and divides remembrance of the events that preceded the fall of communism in Central and Eastern European. The content of the exhibition reveals a story of the different faces of freedom. Individual parts of the exhibition are devoted to freedom of speech and expression, freedom of religion and belief, economic freedom and other themes.

EUscreenXL contributed to the exhibition by creating a unique, moving and historically meaningful video production. It includes archival content that shows important and commonly recognizable personalities and events from the political transformation time in Europe of 1989 and depicts crucial social phenomena also typical for the period. It represents one of the first try-outs of the EUscreen Network activities aimed at reaching new audiences and stepping out of the online world by preparing a physical exhibition.

The video was created by EUscreenXL partners – Deutsche Welle, The Lithuanian Central State Archive, RTV Slovenia, Czech Tevision, National Audiovisual Archive of Hungary, National Audiovisual Institute of Poland (in collaboration with Video Studio Gdańsk), and The Netherlands Institute for Sound and Vision.

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The exhibition will be shown on 4-10 November on Dorothea-Schlegel-Platz – a square located close to the historic Friedrichstraße train station, which, between the years 1961 to 1990, served as a railway border crossing between East and West Berlin.

After Berlin, ‘Roads to 1989’ will be shown this year in Brussels (14-24 November) and Warsaw (28 November-15 December).

Alongside the European tour of the exhibition, its digital version is also available at: http://1989.enrs.eu/exhibition.

 

Freedom Express is asocial and educational campaign organised by the European Network Remembrance and Solidarity. Its first part was a study trip whereby a group of young artists, journalists and historians visited Solidarity’s Gdańsk, then Warsaw, Budapest, Sopron, Timisoara, Bratislava, Prague and Berlin. The trip’s agenda of meetings, workshops and artistic activities was made possible thanks to the cooperation of a number of institutions involved with 20th century history.

More information is available at www.freedomexpress.enrs.eu

You can also follow the event on Facebook.

 

Source: ENRS press information and own materials.
Photos: Krzysztof Dobrogowski, Copyright: European Network Remembrance and Solidarity

Public Service 3.0 International conference on the current transformation of broadcast television

20-21 November 2013, Filmhuset (Stockholm, Sweden)

 Organizers:

Ib Bondebjerg & Patrick Vonderau

Department for Media Studies (IMS), Stockholm University

Department of Media, Cognition and Communication, University of Copenhagen

 

Keynote Speakers:

James Bennett (Royal Holloway, University of London)

Bridget Conor (King’s College, London)

Toby Miller (UC Riverside)

 

Television production, distribution and consumption are currently undergoing major changes. While some fear the «end of television», others have praised the advent of «social TV». Bringing together scholars from Denmark, Sweden, and the United Kingdom, this seminar invites to discuss the current transformation of broadcast television.

Focusing on the role of public broadcasting services, the seminar addresses issues related to regulatory frameworks and commissioning structures, multiplatform production and digital distribution. It also sheds light on changing conditions for media work, on new forms of content creation and storytelling strategies. How do PBS deal with the challenge of new independent online providers? What strategies for digital content provision and audience interaction are they developing? What implications does the digital landscape hold for creative work and content providers?

In taking up these and related questions, the overall aim of this meeting is to stipulate international collaboration that may lead to collaborative research projects of relevance to Media Studies but even to legislators, commissioners, programmers and practitioners working in the television industries.

 

Registration:

Conference Management:

Chris Baumann & Kit Krogvig

Attendance is free, but registration is required

chris.baumann@ims.su.se

 

 

Launch of the European (Post)Socialist Television History Network

The European (Post)Socialist Televsion History Network has recently come into existence. The network is a first collaborative platform dedicated to furthering comparative research into (post)socialist television histories and contributing to transnational approaches to television in Europe. The network is coordinated by Dana Mustata (University of Groningen) together with Anikó Imre (University of Southern California), Irena Carpentier Reifová (Charles University Prague), Lars Lundgren (Södertörn University Stockholm) and Ferenc Hammer (ELTE University Budapest). It will be collaborating closely with the European Television History Network. 

To mark its launch, the European (Post)Socialist Television History Network together with the Centre for Baltic and East European Studies at Södertörn University organizes a one-day international seminar on ‘Television Histories in (Post)Socialist Europe’, which will take place on November 7th, 2013 in Stockholm, Sweden. The event is a full day of round table discussions and presentations exploring the state of the art and a future agenda for studying (post)socialist television in Europe. Topics of discussion include, but are not limited to:

  • Remembering the socialist past
  • Television audiences in (post)socialist Europe
  • Technopolitics of television under socialism
  • Transnational relations of socialist television
  • Socialist television programmes
  • Screening socialist events
  • Methodological and theoretical challenges of studying (post)socialist television
  • Contributions of (post)socialist television to European television history
  • Archival challenges of accessing (post)socialist television

Confirmed speakers:

Sabina Mihelj – keynote speaker (Loughborough University, UK)

Anikó Imre (University of Southern California, USA)

Irena Carpentier Reifová (Charles University, Czech Republic)

Lars Lundgren (Södertörn University, Sweden)

Ferenc Hammer (ELTE University, Hungary)

Dana Mustata (University of Groningen, the Netherlands)

Patrik Åker (Södertörn University, Sweden)

Additional speakers to be announced.

 

Those interested in presenting are asked to send a 150-word abstract to D.Mustata@rug.nl by October 11th, 2013

To attend the seminar, please register for free at: http://post-socialisttvhistory.eventbrite.com.

Those interested in joining the European (Post)Socialist Television History Network can email Dana Mustata at D.Mustata@rug.nl. 

How to Aggregate and Enrich Television Content

EUscreenXL Regional Workshops

A report by BUFVC’s Andrew Ormsby.

Content providers from archives and broadcasters across Europe attended EUscreenXL workshops in London, Warsaw and Barcelona during May and June as part of Work Package 2: Aggregating and Enriching Content. The British Universities Film and Video Council (BUFVC), NInA (The National Audiovisual Institute of Poland) and Televisio de Catalunya (TVC3), generously hosted a series of busy and productive meetings, with presentations, demonstrations, discussions and one to one sessions.

Work Package 2 forms the bedrock of the EUscreenXL project: its objective is to add at least one million aggregated metadata records of audiovisual items to Europeana, as well as adding an enriched core collection of 20,000 moving image items to the EUscreen portal.

During the workshops Marco Rendina of Cinecittà Luce spoke about metadata schema, Dr Rob Turnock of Royal Holloway, University of London, presented an overview of content selection policy, and Eve-Marie Oesterlen and Andrew Ormsby, of the BUFVC, outlined a proposed workflow plan for the aggregated content and the enriched core collection. Vassilis Tzouvaras (in London) and Arne Stabenau (in Warsaw and Barcelona), from NTUA, gave technical demonstrations of the MINT tool, showing content providers how to import datasets and map their metadata schemas in preparation for publication to Europeana and the EUscreen portal.

In addition, in London, Eve-Marie Oesterlen spoke about the BUFVC’s work and showed clips from the Roundabout collection. This consists of 600 films from the Technicolor cinemagazine Roundabout (1962-1974) which are now freely available on the BUFVC website. At the Warsaw workshop Karolina Czerwinska explained how NiNa is taking the lead in the digitisation and publishing of archives documenting Polish audiovisual heritage. In Barcelona, Imma Rull very kindly led the group on a fascinating tour of the TVC3 archive.

A series of focused one to one sessions on the final day of each workshop, gave content providers the opportunity to discuss metadata, content selection, IPR issues, technical matters and workflow with the WP2 team. The results of the workshops will now feed into the meeting in Mykonos in September, when the WP2 team will present the finalised metadata schema and content selection policy as well as the finalised delivery workflow, along with guidelines for support and monitoring for the duration of the project.

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European Television Memories

Third issue of open access VIEW Journal for European Television History & Culture highlights debates on how television fosters the moving borders of national memories.

VIEW issue 03 cover image

Cover image © Special collection Bibliothèque Forney

VIEW, the Journal of European Television History and Culture is the first peer-reviewed, multi-media and open access e-journal in the field of European television history and culture. It offers an international platform for outstanding academic research and archival reflection on television as an important part of our European cultural heritage. The journal is proud to present its third issue: European Television Memories. It has been guest-edited by Jérôme Bourdon & Berber Hagedoorn and is freely available at: http://www.viewjournal.eu

In the context of the fast development of memory studies, the third issue of VIEW highlights debates around the moving borders of national memories, fostered by television in the context of European history. The articles in this issue focus on the contribution of European television researchers, covering all three areas of media studies: production, text and reception. They touch upon a broad range of topics, including:

  • the reconstruction of the national past after regime changes in both Southern and Eastern Europe;
  • competing versions of the “same” past;
  • the fragile fostering of a European identity;
  • the regional/would-be national past.

The issue emphasizes the different ethnographic & historical uses of life-stories from television viewers. It hints at the possible changes to memory formation brought about by television in the post-network digital era. Finally, this issue charts the field of European television memories and suggests ways it can be researched further, both nationally and transnationally.

We wish you a pleasant and inspiring journey through European Television Memories!

Table of Contents

Editorial – Jérôme Bourdon,  Berber Hagedoorn

DISCOVERIES

  1. ‘Remembering Our First TV Set’. Personal Memories as a Source for Television Audience History – Cecilia Penati
  2. “It’s just so hard to bring it to mind”: The Significance of ‘Wallpaper’ in the Gendering of Television Memory Work – Hazel Collie
  3. Martin Luther in Primetime. Television Fiction and Cultural Memory Construction in Cold War Germany – Stewart Anderson
  4. The Production of Czechoslovakia´s Most Popular Television Serial ‘The Hospital on the Outskirts’ and its Post-1989 Repeats – Petr Bednařík
  5. Parallel Stories, Differentiated Histories. Exploring Fiction and Memory in Spanish and Portuguese Television – José Carlos Rueda Laffond, Carlota Coronado Ruiz, Catarina Duff Burnay, Susana Díaz Pérez, Amparo Guerra Gómez, Rogério Santos
  6. Looking for What You Are Looking for: A Media Researcher’s First Search in a Television Archive – Jasmijn Van Gorp

EXPLORATIONS

  1. Television as a Hybrid Repertoire of Memory. New Dynamic Practices of Cultural Memory in the Multi-Platform Era – Berber Hagedoorn
  2. Why Should We Study Socialist Commercials? – Anikó Imre
  3. Window to the West: Memories of Watching Finnish Television in Estonia During the Soviet Period – Annika Lepp, Mervi Pantti
  4. The Life and Afterlife of a Socialist Media Friend. On the Longterm Cultural Relevance of the Polish TV Series ‘Czterdziestolatek’ – Kinga S. Bloch
  5. Chronology and Ideology. Temporal Structuring in Israeli Historical Documentary Series – Bosmat Garami
  6. Great Escapes from the Past. Memory and Identity in European Transnational Television News – Andreas Widholm
  7. Memory, Television and the Making of the BBC’s ‘The Story of Wales’ – Steve Blandford, Ruth McElroy

Publishing info

VIEW is published by the Netherlands Institute for Sound and Vision in collaboration with Utrecht University, Maastricht University and Royal Holloway University of London. It is supported by the EUscreenXL project, the European Television History Network and the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research.

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