European Television Memories

Third issue of open access VIEW Journal for European Television History & Culture highlights debates on how television fosters the moving borders of national memories.

VIEW issue 03 cover image

Cover image © Special collection Bibliothèque Forney

VIEW, the Journal of European Television History and Culture is the first peer-reviewed, multi-media and open access e-journal in the field of European television history and culture. It offers an international platform for outstanding academic research and archival reflection on television as an important part of our European cultural heritage. The journal is proud to present its third issue: European Television Memories. It has been guest-edited by Jérôme Bourdon & Berber Hagedoorn and is freely available at: http://www.viewjournal.eu

In the context of the fast development of memory studies, the third issue of VIEW highlights debates around the moving borders of national memories, fostered by television in the context of European history. The articles in this issue focus on the contribution of European television researchers, covering all three areas of media studies: production, text and reception. They touch upon a broad range of topics, including:

  • the reconstruction of the national past after regime changes in both Southern and Eastern Europe;
  • competing versions of the “same” past;
  • the fragile fostering of a European identity;
  • the regional/would-be national past.

The issue emphasizes the different ethnographic & historical uses of life-stories from television viewers. It hints at the possible changes to memory formation brought about by television in the post-network digital era. Finally, this issue charts the field of European television memories and suggests ways it can be researched further, both nationally and transnationally.

We wish you a pleasant and inspiring journey through European Television Memories!

Table of Contents

Editorial – Jérôme Bourdon,  Berber Hagedoorn

DISCOVERIES

  1. ‘Remembering Our First TV Set’. Personal Memories as a Source for Television Audience History – Cecilia Penati
  2. “It’s just so hard to bring it to mind”: The Significance of ‘Wallpaper’ in the Gendering of Television Memory Work – Hazel Collie
  3. Martin Luther in Primetime. Television Fiction and Cultural Memory Construction in Cold War Germany – Stewart Anderson
  4. The Production of Czechoslovakia´s Most Popular Television Serial ‘The Hospital on the Outskirts’ and its Post-1989 Repeats – Petr Bednařík
  5. Parallel Stories, Differentiated Histories. Exploring Fiction and Memory in Spanish and Portuguese Television – José Carlos Rueda Laffond, Carlota Coronado Ruiz, Catarina Duff Burnay, Susana Díaz Pérez, Amparo Guerra Gómez, Rogério Santos
  6. Looking for What You Are Looking for: A Media Researcher’s First Search in a Television Archive – Jasmijn Van Gorp

EXPLORATIONS

  1. Television as a Hybrid Repertoire of Memory. New Dynamic Practices of Cultural Memory in the Multi-Platform Era – Berber Hagedoorn
  2. Why Should We Study Socialist Commercials? – Anikó Imre
  3. Window to the West: Memories of Watching Finnish Television in Estonia During the Soviet Period – Annika Lepp, Mervi Pantti
  4. The Life and Afterlife of a Socialist Media Friend. On the Longterm Cultural Relevance of the Polish TV Series ‘Czterdziestolatek’ – Kinga S. Bloch
  5. Chronology and Ideology. Temporal Structuring in Israeli Historical Documentary Series – Bosmat Garami
  6. Great Escapes from the Past. Memory and Identity in European Transnational Television News – Andreas Widholm
  7. Memory, Television and the Making of the BBC’s ‘The Story of Wales’ – Steve Blandford, Ruth McElroy

Publishing info

VIEW is published by the Netherlands Institute for Sound and Vision in collaboration with Utrecht University, Maastricht University and Royal Holloway University of London. It is supported by the EUscreenXL project, the European Television History Network and the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research.

Call for Papers on the Hidden Professions of Television

Television Transmitter Van 1954

Picture shows a transmitter van on a remote site in the heart of the West Country. Publisher / Broadcaster: BBC (British Broadcasting Corporation). Broadcast date: 01/01/1954.

VIEW, the Journal of European Television History and Culture,  is the first peer-reviewed multimedia e-journal in the field of television studies. The theme of the fourth issue is Hidden Professions of Television, which can be interpreted broadly within the European television context. The issue seeks to shine a light on the ‘behind the scenes’ activities of television and their hidden, often unrecognised and uncelebrated personnel and processes.

Call for Papers: Hidden Professions of Television

VIEW Journal of European Television History and Culture, Vol. 2, Issue 4
Deadline for abstracts: May 1st, 2013

Offering an international platform for outstanding academic research on television, VIEW has an interdisciplinary profile and acts both as a platform for critical reflection on the cultural, social and political role of television in Europe’s past & present and as a multimedia platform for the circulation and use of digitized audiovisual material. The journal’s main aim is to function as a showcase for the creative and innovative use of digitised television materials in scholarly work and to inspire a fruitful discussion between audiovisual heritage institutions (especially television archives) and a broader community of television experts and amateurs. In offering a unique technical infrastructure for a multimedia presentation of critical reflections on European television, the journal aims at stimulating innovative narrative forms of online storytelling, making use of the digitized audiovisual collections of television archives around Europe.

For the issue on Hidden Professions or Television, we welcome contributions that may engage across a wide range of selected organisational, administrative or technical activities that have played their understated, invisible parts in the historical formation of television: from aspects of TV continuity for instance, to television outside broadcast management, TV retailing or manufacture, television music or the TV weather forecast. These indicate some of the gaps that this issue seeks both to fill and to explore.

Topics

Proposals are invited on (but not limited to):

  • Personnel involved in all aspects of television, from technicians, production staff, editors to preservationists, administrative staff or media managers
  • ‘Behind the scenes’ activities across the whole spectrum of television broadcasting, including organizational, administrative and technical activities
  • ‘The making of’ understudied TV programmes like the weather forecast
  • Services associated to television consumption, such as TV retailing, manufacturing or repair services
  • Practices that focus on preserving the content (film, video or audio) and making it available for reuse
  • Material artifacts used in television production or post-production

Submission info

  • Contributions are encouraged from authors with different kinds of expertise and interests in television broadcasting, from researchers to television professionals, to archivists and preservationists.
  • Contributions can be in the form of conventional articles, illustrated commentaries or photo-essays.
  • Paper proposals (max. 500 words) are due on May 1st, 2013. Submissions should be sent to the managing editor of the journal, Dana Mustata.
  • Articles (2-4,000 words) will be due on September 1st, 2013.
  • For further information or questions about the issue, please contact Tim O’Sullivan and Andy O’Dwyer, guest editors on this issue.

Hidden professions on EUscreen

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Open Access Journal Advances Scholarship in the Field of European Television History and Culture

VIEW Journal Vol 01 Issue 02/2012

Second VIEW Journal issue

In March 2012, EUscreen launched the first issue of the Journal of European Television History and Culture – the first peer-reviewed, multi-media and open access e-journal in the field of European television history and culture. It offers an international platform for outstanding academic research and archival reflection on television as an important part of our European cultural heritage. Today, EUscreen is proud to present the second issue: Europe on and behind the Screen, which is freely available at: http://journal.euscreen.eu

Embedded audiovisual sources

This second issue comes in a brand new form, with a new title: VIEW, a fresh design and a new member in the team of editors-in-chief: John Ellis from Royal Holloway, University of London.The journal makes use of an open access publishing system, OJS, and has developed a tool to insert relevant audiovisual sources in the online reading experience. The journal also received a redesign to maximise readability. The new name, VIEW, indicates a clear vision for the future of the Journal of European Television History and Culture.

Europe on and Behind the Screen

Its second issue enables a discussion of European television through different themes, approaches and case studies. The Discovery articles zoom in on case studies from different corners of Europe, while the Explorations offer different approaches to writing Europe’s television history and advancing theoretical discussions in the field. The full table of contents for the second issue is:

Editorial – Dana Mustata

DISCOVERIES

1.    Mapping Europe: Images of Europe in the Eurovision Song Contest – Mari Pajala
2.    Spain Was Not Living a Celebration. TVE and Eurovision Song Contest during the years of Franco’s Dictatorship – Juan Francisco Gutiérrez Lozano
3.    The Golden Stag Festival in Ceausescu’s Romania (1968-1971) – Alexandru Matei
4.    Comunicar Europa/Communicating Europe. Spain and television co-productions – Manuel Palacio & Concepción Cascajosa
5.    Zen and the Art of Adaptation – Jeremy Strong

EXPLORATIONS

1.    Live from Moscow: The Celebrations of Yuri Gagarin and Transnational Television in Europe – Lars Lundgren
2.    Reading Between The Lines. A Transnational History of the Franco-British Entente Cordial in Post War Television – Andreas Fickers & Andy O’Dwyer
3.    Transnational Relations Between The BBC And The WDR (1960-1969): The Central Roles Of Hugh Greene And Klaus Von Bismarck – Christian Potschka
4.    Poland’s Return to Europe:  Polish Terrestrial Broadcasters and TV-Fiction – Sylwia Szostak
5.    Hello, Lenin? Soviet Nostalgia on Post-Soviet Television – Kateryna Khinkulova
6.    From European Identity and Media Imperialism to Public Diplomacy: the Changing Rationale behind Euronews – Eva Polonska-Kimunguyi & Patrick Kimunguyi
7.    Télé-clubs and European Television History Beyond the Screen – Ira Wagman

As Dr. Dana Mustata from the University of Groningen, managing editor of the journal, says: “After the book A European Television History by Jonathan Bignell and Andreas Fickers, this issue on Europe on and behind the Screen is the second concerted effort on an European scale dedicated to advancing our understanding of European television.”

View, the Journal of European Television History and Culture, is published by the Netherlands Institute for Sound and Vision in collaboration with Utrecht University, Maastricht University and Royal Holloway University of London. With its interdisciplinary profile, the journal journal is open to many disciplinary perspectives on European television – including television history, media studies, media sociology, cultural studies and television studies. Read more about the journal.

More info

View is made possible by support from the EUscreen project and the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO). The journal works in partnership with the European Television History Network.

 

Reminder: European TV Memories – Call for papers

Image by asleeponasunbeam

Reminder: deadline is September 6th, 2012

CALL FOR PAPERS

Journal of European Television History and Culture

Vol. 2, Issue 3: ‘European TV Memories’

The Journal of European Television History and Culture (http://journal.euscreen.eu) welcomes paper proposals for its third issue dedicated to ‘European TV Memories’ and guest-edited by Jérôme Bourdon (Tel Aviv University) and Berber Hagedoorn (Utrecht University).

The journal is the first peer-reviewed multi-media e-journal in the field of television studies. Offering an international platform for outstanding academic research on television, the journal has an interdisciplinary profile and acts both as a platform for critical reflection on the cultural, social and political role of television in Europe’s past and present as well as a multi-media platform for the circulation and use of digitized audiovisual material.

The journal’s main aim is to function as a showcase for a creative and innovative use of digitized television material in scholarly work, and to inspire a fruitful discussion between audiovisual heritage institutions (especially television archives) and a broader community of television experts and amateurs. In offering a unique technical infrastructure for a multi-media presentation of critical reflections on European television, the journal aims at stimulating innovative narrative forms of online storytelling, making use of the digitized audiovisual collections of television archives around Europe.

The theme of third issue of the journal, due for publication in April 2013, is European TV Memories. The editors welcome two kinds of contributions:

  • scholarly articles (historical, sociological or anthropological with a European focus) of 4,000 words
  • discoveries: journalistic essays (2,500 words) which include audiovisual sources as a central component andreflect on the practical challenges of doing television research in an archival or academic environment (e.g. case studies, new collections, news from archives, audio/video interviews).

European TV Memories

The phrase “European TV Memories” can be understood in many ways, of which we can suggest three:

  • Memories as remembering: memory as content actually remembered and shared (especially in contexts and events triggered by the researcher (focus groups, life stories).
  • Memories as policy: as the way the institutions of European television have tried to engineer, generate, support, and disseminate specific memories (at least, potentially, collective memories, considering the reach of the medium).
  • Memories as text: as they can be inferred from the close analysis of text as vectors of memory.

Although there is no strict correlation, different disciplines have generally focused on different understandings of memory. “Memory as text” is frequent among historians and philosophers, “memory as remembering” is analyzed by social psychologists and sociologists, while “memory as institution” is connected to a more political perspective (political sciences, but history as well).

We invite contributions across disciplines and across different conceptions of memories. Similarly, we would appreciate contributions, which study television memories beyond the genres usually emphasized in the study of memory (news and current affairs and historical programmes). TV series, advertisements, entertainment, can be considered as well.

Finally, three aspects cannot always be limited strictly to the medium of television, which interact with other medium, either “old” or “new”. The memories of news events, for a given viewer/citizen, cannot be isolated from a news culture, which includes the press, once the newsreels, today online news. The memory of cinema is built, to a large extent, through television. This is why we will invite contributors to include other media, especially new and digital media, in their analysis, although the focus should be on television.

Proposals are invited on (but not limited to) the following suggested topics:

Television as an institution of memory

  • the policies of memory in and on television
  • event memories: public/private memories of televised media events
  • commemorations and anniversaries
  • reruns and repetition
  • nostalgia programming and TV memorabilia

Preservation and erasure

  • the impact and challenges of accessing TV history and memory in the digital age, considering a.o.: online access and storage, copyright issues, open source archiving, digital contextualization, user generated data
  • the TV user as archivist
  • the future of TV memory

New cultures of remembering and forgetting (via) television

  • the impact and challenges of new and digital technologies
  • new cultures of viewing and user participation, inside the household (wallpaper memories) and outside
  • the gendering of television technologies and experiences
  • transnational TV memories

Researching television memories

  • the methodological debate: archives, life-stories, political statements

Paper proposals (500 words) are due on September 6th, 2012. Submissions should be sent to the managing editor of the journal, dr. Dana Mustata (journal@euscreen.eu). Articles (2-4,000 words) will be due on December 15th, 2012.Please consult the journal’s Author Guidelines. For further information or questions about this issue, please contact Jérôme Bourdon and Berber Hagedoorn.

CfP: Moving at Different Speeds

Call for papers for Comunicazioni sociali, I, 2013

The Commercialization of Television Systems in Europe and its Consequences

Monographic issue. Accepted languages: English, Italian, and French
Issue Co-editors: Massimo Scaglioni, Luca Barra (Università Cattolica di Milano)

One of the most compelling and current challenges for television studies is to work on the edge of national and international boundaries. Such work must attempt to scrutinize the  historical evolutions of the different television national systems in the light of broader, supranational trends (Bignell-Fickers 2008; Bourdon 2011).

Following a comparative approach, and in order to better understand the developments of European television, the focus on commercialization is without any doubt productive: the entry of private and adbased players in TV national markets is a major phenomenon that has affected European broadcasting systems at different times and speeds, with complex consequences. Starting from the strong tradition of public service broadcasting and, in many cases, of monopoly, European television has experienced the birth of commercial TV at different points of its history, from the first experiments in the UK during the Fifties until the articulated – and often contradictory – process of deregulation and “liberalization” that occurred in many continental countries from the Seventies, as well – in Eastern Europe – along the Nineties.

This special issue of Comunicazioni sociali will analyze the gradual diffusion of several models of commercial TV throughout the decades into different nations across Europe. It aims to provide readers with an outline of the implications of commercialization at the social, cultural, institutional, political, textual and technological level, through case studies of individual nations or regions, comparative studies or theoretical analyses.

Call for Papers

Abstracts are invited for contributions to a special issue that will seek to further our understanding of the historical dynamics of TV commercialization that have differently shaped broadcasting systems in various European contexts: similarities and differences will emerge, contributing to a deeper comprehension both of European television histories and of the historical logics and developments of the medium. These can include:

  • Early commercial broadcasting in Europe, both as lasting or “experimental” experiences;
  • Definitions and implications of TV commercialization;
  • Consequences of TV commercialization on a social and cultural level;
  • Consequences of TV commercialization on a political and economical level;
  • TV commercialization and changes in the logics of broadcasting;
  • TV commercialization and production practices;
  • TV commercialization and scheduling practices;
  • TV commercialization and genre (re)definitions;
  • TV commercialization and textual evolutions;
  • TV commercialization and its consequences on the broader media system;
  • TV commercialization and consumption practices;
  • TV commercialization and changes in audience conceptualization;
  • Theoretical approaches on TV commercialization;
  • Original research findings on single case histories and nations.

Paper proposals (250-300 words, in English, French or Italian), along with short biographical notes and key bibliographical references, are due by October 31th, 2012.

Submissions should be sent to both the editors, Massimo Scaglioni (massimo.scaglioni@unicatt.it) and Luca Barra (luca.barra@unicatt.it). Notifications of acceptance will be sent no later than November 15th, 2012.

Accepted articles (3500-5000 words, in English, French or Italian) will be due on January 31th, 2013, and will be subject to a double-blind peer review. The issue of Comunicazioni sociali will be published in April/May 2013.

About Comunicazioni sociali

Founded in 1973, Comunicazioni sociali is a journal that features both monographic and miscellaneous issues, dealing with critical questions pertaining to studies of the performing arts, film, radio, television, journalism, advertising and new media. Founded on an interdisciplinary approach, the journal has since its inception promoted rigorous debates on media content, representation and
consumption in terms of theory, history and critical analysis. The journal has enhanced exchanges with academic institutions, research centres, European networks and prominent scholars, by hosting both theoretical elaborations as well as empirical findings. Since 2009, the journal has adopted the double-blind peer review system and enhanced the international profile of its editorial board, including scholars from European and extra-European countries.

EUscreen releases open access Journal of European Television History and Culture

http://journal.euscreen.eu

Today, the EUscreen project releases the first peer-reviewed, multi-media and open access e-journal in the field of European television history and culture. The aim of this e-journal is to provide an international platform for outstanding research and reflection on television as an important part of our European cultural heritage.

The Journal of European Television History and Culture builds on recent digitisation initiatives in European archives and audiovisual libraries and addresses the need for critical study of the cultural, social and political role of television in Europe’s past and presence with the help of television material that has now become available at a large scale.

The first issue of the journal is a prototype, created in the open access publishing platform Open Journal Systems. The second version, due to appear in September 2012, will add important technical functionalities that will turn it into a true multimedia platform for online storytelling.

The Journal of European Television History and Culture has the ambition to speak to both the academic and the professional community but will address a larger audience interested in television as a cultural phenomenon, says Sonja de Leeuw, EUscreen’s project coordinator and editor-in-chief of the journal.

Broadcast historians, media studies scholars, audiovisual archivists, television professionals as well as the large group of enthusiastic fans of “old” television will have the opportunity to dive into the history and presence of European television by means of multi-media texts.

The journal is the result of a cooperation between the EUscreen platform and researchers from the European Television History Network (ETHN), which was launched in 2004 to promote a transnational perspective on the history and culture of television in Europe. It is published by the Utrecht University Library (Igitur publishing) in collaboration with Utrecht University, Maastricht University and Royal Holloway College / University of London and will be continued with funding from the Dutch National Research Board.

Visit http://journal.euscreen.eu to dive into Vol 1, No 1 (2012): Making Sense of Digital Sources

Links

CfP: Europe on and Behind the Screens

Mirrored Video at the Cinema Museum, Turin, Italy. Image from Flickr by ezioman.

Contributions are welcome for Volume 2 of the Journal of European Television History and Culture, which is the first peer-reviewed multi-media e-journal in the field of television studies.

Call for Papers: Vol. 2 September 2012.
Deadlines:
500 word proposals: January 5th, 2012.
2-4,000 word articles: April 1st, 2012.

Offering an international platform for outstanding academic research on television, the journal has an interdisciplinary profile and acts both as a platform for critical reflection on the cultural, social and political role of television in Europe’s past and present as well as a multi-media platform for the circulation and use of digitized audiovisual material.

Our main aim is to function as a showcase for a creative and innovative use of digitised television material in scholarly work. At the same time, the journal intends to stimulate the fruitful discussion between audiovisual heritage institutions (especially television archives) and a broader community of television experts and amateurs. In offering a unique technical infrastructure for a multi-media presentation of critical reflections on European television, the journal aims at stimulating innovative narrative forms of online storytelling, making use of the digitized audiovisual collections of television archives around Europe.

The focus of Vol 2 of the journal, due for publication in September 2012, will be Europe on and Behind the Screens.

 

 

Proposals are invited on (but not limited to) the following topics:

Europe on the screen:

  • Eurovision or Intervision programmes:
    • Eurovision/ Intervision Song Contest
    • European News Exchange
    • Jeux Sans Frontières
    • Sports
  • National Programmes dealing with Europe:
    • “With Europe in View” (BBC)
    • European Journal
    • European politics / public sphere
    • History of European integration on television
  • Europe television culture:
    • Comparative studies on European television cultures
    • Europeanization / Americanization / Sovietization of television
    • Development of European television audiences

Europe behind the screen:

    • The History of European broadcasting institutions (E.B.U. and O.I.R.T.) and bi-lateral cooperation between national broadcasters
    • Hidden collaboration between East (OIRT) and West (EBU) during Cold War
    • Political initiatives to promote television as a means for European understanding (TV without frontiers,…)
    • The infrastructures of European live transmissions and programme exchange
    • Transnational Actors and Personalities: programme makers, engineers, technicians, presenters
    • Subversive cross-border viewing practices in totalitarian regimes
    • Commercial initiatives and programme trade in the European television landscape
    • Legal frameworks of European television trade and exchange, especially copy right problems

For our “discovery”-section, a platform dedicated to present latest developments and initiatives in the field of audiovisual heritage institutions and television archives, we especially invite contributions dealing with past experiences and future challenges of collaborations between television scholars and audiovisual heritage institutions. These essays (2.500 words) should reflect on the practical challenges of doing television research in an archival or academic environment.

Please send your abstracts no later than 5h of January, 2012 to the managing editor of the journal, Dana Mustata: journal@euscreen.eu

 

 

 

 

 

 

Feature on EUscreen in D-Lib Magazine

By Wietske van den Heuvel

D-Lib Magazine has included a feature about EUscreen in it’s May/June issue. D-Lib is an online journal “with a focus on digital library research and development, including new technologies, applications, and contextual social and economic issues. D-Lib Magazine appeals to a broad technical and professional audience. The primary goal of the magazine is timely and efficient information exchange for the digital library community to help digital libraries be a broad interdisciplinary field, and not a set of specialties that know little of each other.” (D-Lib website)

The article about EUscreen can be found in the “In Brief” section. It describes the main project goals in general, and the connection to Europeana, the development of user requirements and software in more detail. The article can be found here.

Funded by: Connected to: