Conference Notes: Content in Motion | Curating Europe’s Audiovisual Heritage: Session 5 & Closing Keynote

Author: Yashar Dehaghani, Sian Barber
Copyright: National Library of Sweden

Opening & Session 1 | Session 2 | Session 3 | Session 4 | Session 5 & Closing Keynote

 

The fifth and last session of our #EUscreen15 conference, “Transmedia Storytelling For Archive Materials”, examined the potential of AV archives as tools for storytellers; in cinema, exhibitions and museums as well as in academic research and presentation. The session included talks from Andreas Fickers on transmedia storytelling and media history, Piotr C. Śliwowski on the making of the film “Warsaw Uprising”, and Daniela Petrelli on using design to intertwine digital and physical heritage, and was opened and moderated by Berber Hagedoorn from University of Groningen.

Dean Jansen’s closing keynote speech was on community-driven video accessibility and Amara – the world’s most popular crowdsourcing platform for subtitling video.

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VIEW Journal Call for Papers: TV Formats and Format Research

Author: Erwin Verbruggen

 

UPDATE: Deadline extended to 14 September 2015.

VIEW Journal of European Television History and Culture, the first peer-reviewed multi-media e-journal in the field of television studies, devotes its 9th issue (Spring 2016) to TV Formats and Format Research: Theory, methodology, history and new developments. This special issue of VIEW seeks to build on existing format scholarship and deepen our understanding of the history and continuing growth of the TV format business from a European perspective.

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Call for Papers on Convergent Television(s)

CfP: VIEW Journal of European Television History and Culture Vol. 3, Issue 6

Convergent Television(s): Political Ideas, Industrial Strategies, Textual Features and Audience Practices.

Since the 1980s, media convergence has become a buzzword for media studies, a crucial site for academic debate and research and especially a major topic of interest for politics, media industries, technics, and audiences. The complex process of media convergence combines technical issues linked to digitization, political ideas of deregulation, corporate strategies of merging, and grassroots’ cultural practices.

TV studies have been discussing the topic of media convergence from many different angles and perspectives: political, institutional, technological, industrial, textual, and cultural issues of convergence have been put to the forefront. The theme of the Fall 2014 issue of VIEW seeks to shine a light on past and on-going processes of convergent television in different national and historical contexts. We welcome contributions that face the topic of convergence from different disciplinary and historical points of view.

Proposals are invited on (but not limited to):

  • Archaeology of TV Convergence: convergence before digitization;
  • Historical cases of successful and/or failed convergence in broadcasting;
  • National or international policies (especially at European level) that are specifically addressed to favour TV and broadcasting convergence;
  • Strategies of convergence (and effects of divergence): how different national broadcasters are confronting the challenges of media convergence and digitization in an innovative (or regressive) way;
  • Historical case studies in terms of convergent business strategies: how TV companies combined with other media or even other than media companies;
  • Players of TV convergence: national or multinational production companies committed to original content production;
  • Technical devices and affordances: how technology has affected the way of producing, distributing and use TV content in a more and more convergent manner;
  • The textual features of Convergent TV: how media convergence affects traditional TV genres, styles and aesthetics
  • Convergent TV formats, transmedia narratives and forms of branded content entertainment;
  • Changing audience habits and practices.

Contributions are encouraged from authors with different expertise and interests in television history, media studies, television studies, media history, political economy of communication, media economics and media industries, audience studies, television professionals and archivists.

Paper proposals (max. 500 words) are due on April 15th. Submissions should be sent to the managing editor of the journal, Dana Mustata (journal@euscreen.eu). Articles (2-4,000 words) will be due on July 1st.

For further information or questions about the issue, please contact the co-editors: Gabriele Balbi (gabriele.balbi@usi.ch) and Massimo Scaglioni (massimo.scaglioni@unicatt.it).

About VIEW Journal of European Television History and Culture

VIEW Journal logoVIEW, Journal of European Television History and Culture (http://viewjournal.eu) is the first peer-reviewed multi-media e-journal in the field of television studies. Offering an international platform for outstanding academic research on television, the journal has an interdisciplinary profile and acts both as a platform for critical reflection on the cultural, social and political role of television in Europe’s past and present as well as a multi-media platform for the circulation and use of digitized audiovisual material.

The journal’s main aim is to function as a showcase for a creative and innovative use of digitized television material in scholarly work, and to inspire a fruitful discussion between audiovisual heritage institutions (especially television archives) and a broader community of television experts and amateurs. In offering a unique technical infrastructure for a multi-media presentation of critical reflections on European television, the journal aims at stimulating innovative narrative forms of online storytelling, making use of the digitized audiovisual collections of television archives around Europe.

 

CfP: Media Homes Conference, Amsterdam

Call for Papers – Media Homes: Material Culture in Twentieth-Century Domestic Life
Friday June 29, 2012 (University of Amsterdam)

Picture by Foxtongue on Flickr

During the early‐twentieth century, a raft of media technologies emerged against the backdrop of
urbanization, industrialization and rationalization. At the same time, the private dwelling developed into a centerpiece of modern conceptions of everyday life. While the domestication of media and their adoption for everyday consumption became one of the crucial factors for constructions of private and public space (Morley 2000), the same holds true for the mediation of the domestic, as new visions and representations of the home invaded magazines, movies, radio broadcasts and TV programs (Spigel 2001).

The conference seeks to explore the close – but rarely discussed – entanglement of these two phenomena in the context of recent debates on materiality in the humanities. Older tensions between approaches focusing on immaterial ‘representations’ on the one hand, and material ‘social practices’ on the other, now seem to have been replaced: firstly, by a common interest in representations and, secondly, by a growing concern for the significance of materiality in social life more generally. ʹMedia homesʹ can thus serve as a test case for investigating the new possibilities created by this situation.

Participants are invited to reconnect the strands between media and material culture, as framed within the locus of the interior and domestic life. Both the concept of ʹmediaʹ and of ʹmaterialityʹ are approached from two angles: the different media used to convey new visions of domestic material culture should be analyzed in their function of not only representing but also molding and creating the ‘home’. At the same time, all media – be it books, radios or personal computers – are material objects in themselves that conquer the private home and give it new meaning as a space of media consumption. The home itself thus emerges as ‘mediated’ in two ways: as a represented – imagined and conceptualized ‐ social space and as a space shaped by the material presence of media.

Against this background a set of key questions can be raised: how are old and new media technologies given meaning within everyday life and family relations? In what ways do domestic dwellers engage with media discourses concerning domestic lifestyle and home improvement? To what extent are categories of class, gender and ethnicity bound up with media consumption and related cultural practices within the home? What are the sensory, embodied dimensions to media consumption within the domestic sphere (visibility and audibility, as well as touch, taste and smell)? In what ways did the onset of digital media encourage a rethinking of the domestic sphere (as ʹhome theatreʹ or smart home)?

Themes for the conference may include, but are not limited to:

  • Media representations of the home, domestic life and ʹconspicuous consumptionʹ
  • Home recording and amateur media practices
  • Memory practices and forms of collecting based on media and the domestic sphere (diaries, scrapbooks, mementos)
  • Trends such as miniaturization and portability, with new constructions of the interior or domestic in public life (e.g. mobile technologies in the car, mobile phones, portable stereos)
  • The relationship between private and public forms of media consumption (cinema‐going, portable stereos)
  • Paradigmatic shifts in conceptualizations of the home and domestic life, and the challenge of periodization for researchers
  • The relationship of the ʹmedia homeʹ to urban, regional, national, and international or transnational identity categories

Please send abstracts (max. 500 words) and a short CV before 20 January 2012 to Natalie Scholz
n.scholz@uva.nl /Carolyn Birdsall c.j.birdsall@uva.nl. A publication related to the conference is planned for February 2013.

 

 

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