VIEW Journal publishes issue 09: TV Formats and Format Research

view-issue_09_800x250

 

EUscreen publishes the open access journal VIEW, which explores Europe’s television history and culture. We’re proud to announce the publication of our summer issue, which is now available in its entirety at www.viewjournal.eu. This ninth issue, on theory, methodology, history and new developments in TV formats and format research, was co-edited by John Ellis, Professor of Media Arts at Royal Holloway, University of London, Andrea Esser, Principal Lecturer in Media and Communications at the University of Roehampton (UK) and Juan Francisco Gutiérrez Lozano, Senior Lecturer in Journalism at the University of Málaga (Spain).

( Read more…)

VIEW Journal Call for Papers on “Non-Fiction Transmedia”

nonfictiontransmediaimage_1000x418

Image credit:  Catalina Acelas

 

VIEW Journal of European Television History and Culture, our peer-reviewed multi-media and open access e-journal in the field of television studies, devotes its 10th issue (Winter 2016) to Non-fiction Transmedia.

With this issue we aim to offer a scholarly perspective on the emergence of transmedia forms, their technological and aesthetic characteristics, the types of audience engagement they engender, the possibilities they create for engagement with archival content, the technological predecessors that they may or may not have emerged from, and the institutional and creative milieux in which they thrive (or don’t thrive). We welcome contributions from all perspectives including but not restricted to aesthetic, sociological, industrial, media archaeological, and audience/reception studies perspectives.

( Read more…)

VIEW Journal publishes issue 08: Archive-Based Productions

VIEW Journal

 

EUscreen publishes the open access journal VIEW, which explores Europe’s television history and culture. We’re proud to announce the publication of our winter issue, which is now available in its entirety at www.viewjournal.eu. This eight issue, on the use and re-use of moving image archives in various productions, was co-edited by Claude Mussou, head of InaTEQUE, and Mette Charis Buchman, senior manager of archive research at Danish Broadcasting Corporation (DR).

( Read more…)

VIEW Journal publishes issue 07: Archaeologies of Tele-Visions and -Realities

Banner VIEW Journal issue 07

 

EUscreen publishes the open access journal VIEW, which explores Europe’s television history and culture. We’re proud to announce the publication of our summer issue, which is now available in its entirety at http://journal.euscreen.eu. This seventh issue was co-edited by Andreas Fickers, Professor for Contemporary and Digital History at the University of Luxembourg, and Anne-Katrin Weber, lecturer at the University of Lausanne.

( Read more…)

VIEW Journal issue on “Convergent Television(s)” now available

VIEW Issue on Convergent Television(s) In March, we published the call for papers for the sixth issue of our open access journal VIEW, which explores Europe’s television history and culture. At the end of December, this latest issue found its way online and it is now available in its entirety at http://journal.euscreen.eu. All articles can be read on screen, where source materials can be found embedded in the article text, or saved as a PDF for reading offline.

The sixth issue is co-edited by Gabriele Balbi, Assistant Professor in Media Studies at the Università della Svizzera italiana, and Massimo Scaglioni, Assistant Professor of Media History at the Catholic University of Milan.

The history of media convergence, especially of convergent television, is a field that needed further investigation. Media convergence is often considered a taken-for-granted phenomenon, a kind of ‘irresistible’ force that has changed and is continuously changing media ecosystems. Furthermore, it seems to be mainly an American phenomenon because it has involved US politics and companies and because the most relevant reflections and publications on this topic come from American scholars.

This issue of VIEW tries to deal with this complex and polysemic concept from different points of view, adopting several theoretical and methodological frameworks. It attempts to counteract some of the aforementioned taken-for-granted ideas, analyzing TV convergence from a historical and long-term perspective, considering symmetrical case studies of success and failures, concentrating on the European dimension through the lens of transnational, comparative, and national contributions.

Table of Contents

  • Editorial – Gabriele Balbi, Massimo Scaglioni

Discoveries

Explorations

Publishing info

VIEW is published by the Netherlands Institute for Sound and Vision in collaboration with Utrecht University, University of Luxembourg and Royal Holloway University of London. It is supported by the EUscreenXL project, the European Television History Network and the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research.

VIEW Issue 5: Television Histories in (Post)Socialist Europe

Author: Dana Mustata

cover_issue_5_en_USThe umbilical relation between television and national languages and cultures has made television in Eastern Europe hard to access outside national borders. The fifth issue of VIEW is entirely dedicated to television histories from Eastern Europe and lays the ground for this emerging area of study.

This special issue opens up new perspectives on television histories from Eastern Europe and situates them beyond the political histories of the nation-state, Cold War isolation and East-West antagonism. It invites readers to question what is ‘socialist’ about television in Europe and reflect upon concepts, methods and approaches pertaining to (post)socialist television in Europe.
 
The issue is guest edited at the initiative of The European (Post)Socialist Television History Network.  It continues the series of activities launched by the network with the aim to stimulate research on television histories from Eastern Europe, encourage comparative approaches to television in the region and create a dialogue with European television scholarship.
 
VIEW, the Journal of European Television History and Culture is the first peer-reviewed, multi-media and open access e-journal in the field of European television history and culture. It provides an international platform for outstanding academic research and archival reflection on television as an important part of our European cultural heritage.
 
VIEW is proud to present its fifth issue on ‘Television Histories in (Post)Socialist Europe,’ which is freely available at: http://journal.euscreen.eu/.
 
Table of Contents

Editorial
Editorial
Dana Mustata

Opening Article
Understanding Socialist Television: Concepts, Objects, Methods
Sabina Mihelj

Discoveries
The Eichmann Trial on East German Television
Judith Keilbach
Intervision. Searching for Traces
Yulia Yurtaeva
Folklore Music on Romanian TV. From State Socialist Television to Private Channels
Alexandra Urdea

Explorations
Exploring Transnational Media Exchange in the 1960s
Heather Gumbert
Connected Enemies? Programming Transfer between East and West During the Cold War and the Example of East German Television
Thomas Beutelschmidt, Richard Oehmig
The Great Époque of the Consumption of Imported Broadcasts. West European Television Channels and Polish Audiences during the System Transition
Patryk Wasiak
Italianization Accomplished. Forms and Structures of Albanian Television’s Dependency on Italian Media and Culture
Paolo Carelli
East and West on the Finnish Screen. Early Transnational Television in Finland
Mari Pajala
Retro Reappropriations. Responses to ‘The Thirty Cases of Major Zeman’ in the Czech Republic
Veronika Pehe
Multiple Faces of the Nostalgia Channel in Russia
Ekaterina Kalinina
The Problem of Personality on the Soviet Screen, 1950s-1960s
Simon Huxtable
Comparing Socialist and Post-Socialist Television Culture. Fifty Years of Television in Croatia
Zrinjka Peruško, Antonija Čuvalo

International Journal of Digital Television issue 5.1 now available

The issue 5.1 of the peer review International Journal of Digital Television is now out and you can access it here . The journal aims to describe and explain the transition to digital TV and address the social and cultural questions surrounding the future of television beyond switchover. Content is broad and varied, ranging from a mixture of critical work on technological, industry and regulatory convergence, to the emerging wider socio-cultural and political questions such as audience behaviour, plurality of TV channels and television influence.

journalIn the current issue you can read articles from Toby Miller, Terry Flew, S. Papathanassopoulos, conference reports by I. Katsirea and Darcy Gerbarg, three book reviews, a special theme on ‘Private TV in Europe’ guest edited by Karen Donders and Caroline Pauwels with contributions from Maria Michalis, Tom Evens, Nele Simons and others.

You are all welcome to send ideas for full articles (6-6,500 words), short commentaries (1,500-2,000 words) and conference reports to be considered in the journal to Professor Petros Iosifidis (Department of Sociology, City University London), P.Iosifidis@city.ac.uk. The deadline for submitting them for issue 5.2 is end-June 2014 and for issue 5.3 mid-October 2014.

Potential issues to be addressed in future include, among others: the extent to which new media developments and changing media consumption require changes in regulatory philosophy and business practice; the extent to which globalisation, privatisation and deregulation alter the creative freedom and public accountability of media enterprises; whether digital TV actually increases choice and diversity or just offers more of the same and/or recycled programmes; concentration of media ownership and its effect on pluralism and diversity; national debates about the role of public service broadcasting in the digital epoch; comparative analyses of global TV formats; television for children; sports programming and televised sports rights.

Scope: An Online Journal of Film and Television Studies issue 26 now published

scopeScope is a fully peer-reviewed online journal edited by staff and students in the Department of Culture, Film and Media and Institute for Screen Industries Research at the University of Nottingham. Scope provides a forum for discussion of all aspects of film and television history, theory and criticism.

Scope: An Online Journal of Film and Television Studies issue 26 has been recently published.  The open-access resource is available here:  http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/scope/february-issue-26.aspx

 

 

Archives

Recent Posts

Tags

Partner Zone

Funded by: Connected to: