Registration open for FIAT/IFTA Television Studies Seminar

Registration is now open for the second international Television Studies Seminar, hosted by the BFI (British Film Institute) at its South Bank premises in London on September 28th, 2012. Attending the event is free, but registration is required at: http://www.eventbrite.com/event/4169035698. The seminar will present academic papers based on research conducted in FIAT/IFTA member archives and illustrated by extracts provided by those archives.

BFI Southbank by pixelthing

Programme

11.00-12.15 Sport & the Olympics (Chair: Steve Bryant, BFI)

  • Keynote address: The Mediatisation of Sport – Eggo Muller, University of Utrecht
  • The History of the DR Visual Archive Exemplified by Olympic Events from 1952-2012 -Mette Charis Buchman & Henrik Frost, DR Archive and Research

12:15-13.30 Lunch

13.30-15.00 Media Events and Politics (Chair: Dana Mustata, University of Groningen)

  • Reaching Across the Divide: Early Cross-Border Collaboration Between RTE and Ulster Television – Ken Griffin, University of Ulster
  • Images of the Masses in the Spanish Transition to Democracy: Representation of Change on Television – Manuel Palacio and Concepcion Cascajosa, Carlos III University of Madrid
  • The Eichmann Trial: Memory of the Past as Global Media Event – Judith Keilbach, Utrecht University
  • Visualising History and Memory for a Young Target Audience in Dutch Multi-Platform TV – Berber Hagedoorn, Utrecht University

15.00-15.30 Tea

15.30-16.45 British Perspectives (Chair: Andy O’Dwyer, BBC)

  • Broadcasting from a Boat! Uncovering Southern Television, from Document to Moving Image – Elinor Groom, Nottingham University
  • A Special Relationship: Lost British Television Drama at the Library of Congress – Lisa Kerrigan, British Film Institute
  • John Grierson and the British Television Documentary – Nathan Budzinski

16.45-17.00 Presentation of EUscreen’s Journal of European Television History and Culture – Dana Mustata, University of Groningen

Researching Film and Television Through the Archive

The National Film and Sound Archive's collection contains approximately 1.7 million collection items.

The one-day multi-disciplinary symposium Researching Film and Television Through the Archive, jointly hosted on November 9th 2012 by University of Warwick’s Department of Film and Television Studies and the Institute of Advanced Study, will explore the practices and implications of researching film and television through the archive.

Making the archive the basis of a project or incorporating archival research into an existing project can be an insightful, rewarding, and frequently also a frustrating experience. The symposium will offer a space for archival researchers from across disciplines to share practices, methodologies and experiences of using different types of archives to research film and television texts, contexts and histories.

Call for Contributions

Abstracts are invited for contributions that seek to further understand the possibilities and boundaries of conducting archival research. Contributions can take the form of a 20 minute paper – outlining research ideas related to the themes of the symposium – or a 10 minute presentation – discussing the practical, methodological or scholarly implications of using archival research as an aspect of film and television research.

Contributions are particularly welcome in the following areas:

  • Archival research methodologies
  • Why do archival research?
  • The allure of the archive
  • Practical aspects of using archives
  • Archiving policy and practice
  • The possibilities of the archive
  • The limits and limitations of archival research
  • The archive, impact and the REF

Abstracts (max 200 words), along with a short biographical note and a specification of the type of contribution you wish to make, are due by Monday October 8th 2012. Please send your abstract to Richard.wallace@warwick.ac.uk .

 

Reminder: European TV Memories – Call for papers

Image by asleeponasunbeam

Reminder: deadline is September 6th, 2012

CALL FOR PAPERS

Journal of European Television History and Culture

Vol. 2, Issue 3: ‘European TV Memories’

The Journal of European Television History and Culture (http://journal.euscreen.eu) welcomes paper proposals for its third issue dedicated to ‘European TV Memories’ and guest-edited by Jérôme Bourdon (Tel Aviv University) and Berber Hagedoorn (Utrecht University).

The journal is the first peer-reviewed multi-media e-journal in the field of television studies. Offering an international platform for outstanding academic research on television, the journal has an interdisciplinary profile and acts both as a platform for critical reflection on the cultural, social and political role of television in Europe’s past and present as well as a multi-media platform for the circulation and use of digitized audiovisual material.

The journal’s main aim is to function as a showcase for a creative and innovative use of digitized television material in scholarly work, and to inspire a fruitful discussion between audiovisual heritage institutions (especially television archives) and a broader community of television experts and amateurs. In offering a unique technical infrastructure for a multi-media presentation of critical reflections on European television, the journal aims at stimulating innovative narrative forms of online storytelling, making use of the digitized audiovisual collections of television archives around Europe.

The theme of third issue of the journal, due for publication in April 2013, is European TV Memories. The editors welcome two kinds of contributions:

  • scholarly articles (historical, sociological or anthropological with a European focus) of 4,000 words
  • discoveries: journalistic essays (2,500 words) which include audiovisual sources as a central component andreflect on the practical challenges of doing television research in an archival or academic environment (e.g. case studies, new collections, news from archives, audio/video interviews).

European TV Memories

The phrase “European TV Memories” can be understood in many ways, of which we can suggest three:

  • Memories as remembering: memory as content actually remembered and shared (especially in contexts and events triggered by the researcher (focus groups, life stories).
  • Memories as policy: as the way the institutions of European television have tried to engineer, generate, support, and disseminate specific memories (at least, potentially, collective memories, considering the reach of the medium).
  • Memories as text: as they can be inferred from the close analysis of text as vectors of memory.

Although there is no strict correlation, different disciplines have generally focused on different understandings of memory. “Memory as text” is frequent among historians and philosophers, “memory as remembering” is analyzed by social psychologists and sociologists, while “memory as institution” is connected to a more political perspective (political sciences, but history as well).

We invite contributions across disciplines and across different conceptions of memories. Similarly, we would appreciate contributions, which study television memories beyond the genres usually emphasized in the study of memory (news and current affairs and historical programmes). TV series, advertisements, entertainment, can be considered as well.

Finally, three aspects cannot always be limited strictly to the medium of television, which interact with other medium, either “old” or “new”. The memories of news events, for a given viewer/citizen, cannot be isolated from a news culture, which includes the press, once the newsreels, today online news. The memory of cinema is built, to a large extent, through television. This is why we will invite contributors to include other media, especially new and digital media, in their analysis, although the focus should be on television.

Proposals are invited on (but not limited to) the following suggested topics:

Television as an institution of memory

  • the policies of memory in and on television
  • event memories: public/private memories of televised media events
  • commemorations and anniversaries
  • reruns and repetition
  • nostalgia programming and TV memorabilia

Preservation and erasure

  • the impact and challenges of accessing TV history and memory in the digital age, considering a.o.: online access and storage, copyright issues, open source archiving, digital contextualization, user generated data
  • the TV user as archivist
  • the future of TV memory

New cultures of remembering and forgetting (via) television

  • the impact and challenges of new and digital technologies
  • new cultures of viewing and user participation, inside the household (wallpaper memories) and outside
  • the gendering of television technologies and experiences
  • transnational TV memories

Researching television memories

  • the methodological debate: archives, life-stories, political statements

Paper proposals (500 words) are due on September 6th, 2012. Submissions should be sent to the managing editor of the journal, dr. Dana Mustata (journal@euscreen.eu). Articles (2-4,000 words) will be due on December 15th, 2012.Please consult the journal’s Author Guidelines. For further information or questions about this issue, please contact Jérôme Bourdon and Berber Hagedoorn.

CFP: Television for Women

Television for Women: An International Conference: Call for Papers
University of Warwick, Coventry, UK, 15th-17th May 2013
Keynote Speakers: Charlotte Brunsdon, Christine Geraghty, Kathleen Karlyn and Lynn Spigel

At the culmination of the AHRC-funded project, A History of Television for Women in Britain, 1947-89, the project team (Dr. Mary Irwin, Dr. Rachel Moseley and Dr. Helen Wheatley (Warwick), and Hazel Collie and Dr. Helen Wood (De Montfort)) are organising a three day conference which seeks to open up and internationalise debate about the past, present and future of television programming for women.

Whilst television has traditionally been identified as a ‘feminised’ medium, because it is apparently ‘domestic, passive and generally oriented to consumption, rather than production’ (D’Acci, 2004), there are still significant gaps in our knowledge of the relationship between television and women. The team is therefore interested in hearing from scholars about television programming made for and watched by women viewers throughout the history of broadcasting and in the contemporary period, and would welcome both other researchers writing about the UK and those offering comparative work overseas.

Whilst the project has worked to fill in some of the some of the gaps in the history of women’s television, outlining significant moments in their research period, specific programme types, genres and scheduling slots which have become significantly marked as feminine, they know that there are many more gaps to fill, and hope that this conference will be a further step towards this.

Potential topics

  • Rethinking broadcasting histories: where have women’s programmes and viewing practices been left out?
  • National histories of programming for women. Is ‘TV for Women’ a global phenomenon?
  • Female audiences: speaking to them, mapping their tastes and interests.
  • Institutional/production perspectives on addressing the female viewer: how have broadcasters envisaged ‘what women want’?
  • Questions of gender and genre.
  • Representation of women and women’s concerns and cultural competences on television (as addressed to the female viewer).
  • Feminist (and post-feminist) address and representation on television.
  • Significant programme makers/teams/production companies in the production of television for women: is TV for women TV by women?
  • Channels for women in the multichannel age: Lifestyle, Living, etc.
  • Archiving issues that relate to women’s TV culture.
  • Analyses of magazines and TV ephemera (listings guides, women’s magazines, promotional materials, etc.) and their address to the female viewer.
  • Other media, other screens: histories of women’s radio, the female viewer and social media, women viewers on multimedia viewing platforms, which consider their connection to television etc.
  • Understanding female TV fandom.
  • The question of generation: how do women remember and relate to television differently at different life stages.

Participate

Abstracts of c.250 should be sent to Helen.Wheatley@warwick.ac.uk by 12th October 2012. Pre-constituted panels of three speakers may also be submitted, and should include a brief panel rationale statement, as well as individual abstracts.

CfP: Moving at Different Speeds

Call for papers for Comunicazioni sociali, I, 2013

The Commercialization of Television Systems in Europe and its Consequences

Monographic issue. Accepted languages: English, Italian, and French
Issue Co-editors: Massimo Scaglioni, Luca Barra (Università Cattolica di Milano)

One of the most compelling and current challenges for television studies is to work on the edge of national and international boundaries. Such work must attempt to scrutinize the  historical evolutions of the different television national systems in the light of broader, supranational trends (Bignell-Fickers 2008; Bourdon 2011).

Following a comparative approach, and in order to better understand the developments of European television, the focus on commercialization is without any doubt productive: the entry of private and adbased players in TV national markets is a major phenomenon that has affected European broadcasting systems at different times and speeds, with complex consequences. Starting from the strong tradition of public service broadcasting and, in many cases, of monopoly, European television has experienced the birth of commercial TV at different points of its history, from the first experiments in the UK during the Fifties until the articulated – and often contradictory – process of deregulation and “liberalization” that occurred in many continental countries from the Seventies, as well – in Eastern Europe – along the Nineties.

This special issue of Comunicazioni sociali will analyze the gradual diffusion of several models of commercial TV throughout the decades into different nations across Europe. It aims to provide readers with an outline of the implications of commercialization at the social, cultural, institutional, political, textual and technological level, through case studies of individual nations or regions, comparative studies or theoretical analyses.

Call for Papers

Abstracts are invited for contributions to a special issue that will seek to further our understanding of the historical dynamics of TV commercialization that have differently shaped broadcasting systems in various European contexts: similarities and differences will emerge, contributing to a deeper comprehension both of European television histories and of the historical logics and developments of the medium. These can include:

  • Early commercial broadcasting in Europe, both as lasting or “experimental” experiences;
  • Definitions and implications of TV commercialization;
  • Consequences of TV commercialization on a social and cultural level;
  • Consequences of TV commercialization on a political and economical level;
  • TV commercialization and changes in the logics of broadcasting;
  • TV commercialization and production practices;
  • TV commercialization and scheduling practices;
  • TV commercialization and genre (re)definitions;
  • TV commercialization and textual evolutions;
  • TV commercialization and its consequences on the broader media system;
  • TV commercialization and consumption practices;
  • TV commercialization and changes in audience conceptualization;
  • Theoretical approaches on TV commercialization;
  • Original research findings on single case histories and nations.

Paper proposals (250-300 words, in English, French or Italian), along with short biographical notes and key bibliographical references, are due by October 31th, 2012.

Submissions should be sent to both the editors, Massimo Scaglioni (massimo.scaglioni@unicatt.it) and Luca Barra (luca.barra@unicatt.it). Notifications of acceptance will be sent no later than November 15th, 2012.

Accepted articles (3500-5000 words, in English, French or Italian) will be due on January 31th, 2013, and will be subject to a double-blind peer review. The issue of Comunicazioni sociali will be published in April/May 2013.

About Comunicazioni sociali

Founded in 1973, Comunicazioni sociali is a journal that features both monographic and miscellaneous issues, dealing with critical questions pertaining to studies of the performing arts, film, radio, television, journalism, advertising and new media. Founded on an interdisciplinary approach, the journal has since its inception promoted rigorous debates on media content, representation and
consumption in terms of theory, history and critical analysis. The journal has enhanced exchanges with academic institutions, research centres, European networks and prominent scholars, by hosting both theoretical elaborations as well as empirical findings. Since 2009, the journal has adopted the double-blind peer review system and enhanced the international profile of its editorial board, including scholars from European and extra-European countries.

CfP: FIAT/IFTA Television Studies Seminar – Deadline 25 May

The International Television Studies Seminar, hosted by the British Film Institute at its South Bank premises London on September 28th 2012, will present academic papers based on research conducted in FIAT/IFTA member archives and illustrated by extracts provided by those archives.

 

Paper proposals should include a brief abstract and details of arrangements made with the television archive where the research will be conducted.  Participating FIAT/IFTA member archives will provide research facilities and extracts on DVD free of charge.  The archives represented in the Television Studies Commission are all participating.  These are:

  • BFI (British Film Institute) National Archive, London, UK
  • INA (Institut National de l’Audiovisuel), Paris, France
  • Beeld en Geluid, Hilversum, Netherlands
  • Library of Congress, Culpeper, Va, USA
  • RTÉ (Radio Telefís Éireann), Dublin, Eire

Other FIAT/IFTA member archives may participate upon request.

Contact persons for proposals

Initial enquiries should be made to the appropriate member of the Television Studies Commission and completed proposals sent to the same person by May 25th 2012.  These are:

  • For participants from the UK : Steve Bryant, BFI (steve.bryant@bfi.org.uk)
  • For participants from France and other French-speaking countries: Claude Mussou, INA (cmussou@ina.fr)
  • For Dutch/Flemish speakers: Bert Hogenkamp, Beeld en Geluid (bhogenkamp@beeldengeluid.nl)
  • For US participants: Mike Mashon, Library of Congress (mima@loc.gov)
  • For Central and Eastern European participants and members of the European History Television Network: Dana Mustata, University of Groningen (D.Mustata@rug.nl)
  • For Irish participants: Liam Wylie, RTE (Liam.Wylie@rte.ie)

All other potential participants should send their proposals to Steve Bryant, who will attempt to connect them with the appropriate FIAT/IFTA member archive.

Proposal administration

Participants will be confirmed in early June.  The Seminar language will be English.

Proposals can cover any aspect of television history or practice, though the following topics are suggested:

  • In the context of the London Olympic Games our main theme will be Sport on Television, including how sport drives the development of television technology
  • Media events, including news: the role of technology and viewing platforms and the aspect of collective memory

Registration details for the Seminar will be advised in due course at http://www.fiatifta.org/

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