VIEW Journal Call for Papers: TV Formats and Format Research

Author: Erwin Verbruggen

 

UPDATE: Deadline extended to 14 September 2015.

VIEW Journal of European Television History and Culture, the first peer-reviewed multi-media e-journal in the field of television studies, devotes its 9th issue (Spring 2016) to TV Formats and Format Research: Theory, methodology, history and new developments. This special issue of VIEW seeks to build on existing format scholarship and deepen our understanding of the history and continuing growth of the TV format business from a European perspective.

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EXTENDED DEADLINE: “Archive-Based Productions” Call for Papers

VIEW Journal for European Television History and Culture Vol. 4 Issue 08

*** Extended deadline: February 10, 2015 ***

icoon.icoIn 1927, when Esfir Schub released her commissioned film The fall of the Romanov Dynasty to commemorate the 10th anniversary of the October Revolution, she hardly knew that her extensive use of film footage and newsreels of the event would mark the invention of a new ‘genre’: the archive based production or compilation genre. Television has adopted this genre, but audiovisual archives have fuelled a wide array of programmes and genres beyond compilation productions.

Government, business, broadcast and film archives as well as amateur collections and home videos are commonly used to spark memories and re-enact events from the past in various contexts. They are made widely accessible and re-used in traditional broadcast productions or given a second life in digital environments through online circulation.

 

This issue of VIEW invites scholars, archivists, producers and other practitioners to consider, highlight and elaborate on the use and re-use of moving image archives in media productions (for cinema, television, web, etc.). Contributions are welcome in the form of (short) articles or video essays.

 

Proposals are invited to explore (but not limited to) the following topics and questions:

  • Has the digital environment created a paradigm shift in the use of audiovisual archival materials?
  • The authenticity of audiovisual archives in the digital environment;
  • In what ways can audiovisual archives transform our relationship to the past? What is the role of archives in helping us reconnect with or understand the past? How do national/organisational archive policies impact or limit the histories that are informed by these archives?
  • The audio-visual archive as proof, testimony or document of reality, as shared heritage or collective memory;
  • Case studies using moving images as historical sources;
  • The use of archives in creative productions;
  • Ahistoricism in the use of audiovisual archival materials;
  • Found footage in moving image productions;
  • Compilation programmes studied through issues of representation, distribution, production, reception, etc;
  • Various formats and subgenres of compilation programmes: biographies, historical productions, art forms, etc;
  • Comparative studies of the compilation genre;
  • The search for identity in audiovisual archive collections;
  • The use of national audiovisual collections in a European or international context.

Practical

  • Contributions are encouraged from authors with different kinds of expertise and interests in television and media history.
  • Paper proposals (max. 500 words) are due on January 31st, 2015. Extended deadline: February 10, 2015
  • Submissions should be sent to the managing editor of the journal, Dana Mustata (journal@euscreen.eu). A notice of acceptance will be sent to authors in the 3rd week of February
  • Articles (2 – 4,000 words) will be due on May 15th 2015.
  • For further information or questions about the issue, please contact the co-editors: Mette Charis Buchman (mch@dr.dk) and Claude Mussou (cmussou@ina.fr)

 

See www.viewjournal.eu for the current and back issues. VIEW is proud to be an open access journal. All articles are made findable through the DOAJ and EBSCO databases.

 

Photo credits: Felix Janssens CC BY-SA

 

VIEW Journal issue on “Convergent Television(s)” now available

VIEW Issue on Convergent Television(s) In March, we published the call for papers for the sixth issue of our open access journal VIEW, which explores Europe’s television history and culture. At the end of December, this latest issue found its way online and it is now available in its entirety at http://journal.euscreen.eu. All articles can be read on screen, where source materials can be found embedded in the article text, or saved as a PDF for reading offline.

The sixth issue is co-edited by Gabriele Balbi, Assistant Professor in Media Studies at the Università della Svizzera italiana, and Massimo Scaglioni, Assistant Professor of Media History at the Catholic University of Milan.

The history of media convergence, especially of convergent television, is a field that needed further investigation. Media convergence is often considered a taken-for-granted phenomenon, a kind of ‘irresistible’ force that has changed and is continuously changing media ecosystems. Furthermore, it seems to be mainly an American phenomenon because it has involved US politics and companies and because the most relevant reflections and publications on this topic come from American scholars.

This issue of VIEW tries to deal with this complex and polysemic concept from different points of view, adopting several theoretical and methodological frameworks. It attempts to counteract some of the aforementioned taken-for-granted ideas, analyzing TV convergence from a historical and long-term perspective, considering symmetrical case studies of success and failures, concentrating on the European dimension through the lens of transnational, comparative, and national contributions.

Table of Contents

  • Editorial – Gabriele Balbi, Massimo Scaglioni

Discoveries

Explorations

Publishing info

VIEW is published by the Netherlands Institute for Sound and Vision in collaboration with Utrecht University, University of Luxembourg and Royal Holloway University of London. It is supported by the EUscreenXL project, the European Television History Network and the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research.

VIEW Journal Call for Papers: Archaeologies of Tele-Visions and -Realities

Over the last decade the label “media archaeology” has brought together a growing number of heterogeneous scholarship investigating new forms of historical research and narratives. While the field resists a coherent methodology, media archaeological explorations are generally characterized by their refusal of linear periodization, an emphasis on disregarded objects and historical episodes, and a playful approach of media as hybrid, non-fixed, and unstable material, cultural, discursive and imaginary artifacts.

Photo credit: Michael Shaheen (CC ND-NC)Archaeologies of Tele-Visions and -Realities

This issue of VIEW Journal of European Television History and Culture invites archeological inquiries into the multiple pasts of tele-visions. Since late nineteenth century imaginations of “seeing by electricity”, the phenomenon of “seeing at a distance” has known multiple futures and pasts, deaths and revivals. The aim of this issue is to assess the many lives of television in its different technological stages (electro-mechanical, electrical, electronic and digital) and to highlight the complexity practices, programs and discourses that have shaped television as a technical infrastructure, political and social institution, cultural phenomenon and business model from both diachronic and synchronic perspectives.

The theme of the 7th issue of VIEW (Vol. 4, spring 2015) seeks to shine a light on the multiple histories of television and welcomes contributions that propose archeological excavations from different disciplinary and thematic points of view.

Untold Histories and Forgotten Practices

Proposals are invited on (but not limited to):

  • Object biographies and hybrid technologies: description of obsolete or forgotten technologies and/or apparatuses; hybridity of emerging audio/visual technologies;
  • Archaeology of TV spectatorship: problematizing historical audiences of television beyond domestic consumption;
  • Politics of television: gendering TV before its integration of domestic space; archeology of television’s military uses; shaping television as a consumer object;
  • Questioning televisual paradigms: liveness, simultaneity, ubiquity, participation, etc.
  • Symbolic engineering: imagined and configured uses in both fictional and factional sources
  • Archaeology of televisual programs and formats: intermedial links of early televisual texts;
  • Experimental media archaeology: reenactments and reconstitutions of television technologies and practices;
  • Non-conformist histories of tv: histories of guerilla TV, non-profit and educational television.
  • Archaeology of digital television: histories of televisual participation and interactivity;

Practical

Contributions are encouraged from authors with different expertise and interests in television and media history.

Paper proposals (max. 500 words) are due on November 30th, 2014. Submissions should be sent to the managing editor of the journal, Dana Mustata (journal@euscreen.eu). A notice of acceptance will be send to authors on third week of December. Articles (2-4,000 words) will be due on March 1st, 2015.

For further information or questions about the issue, please contact the co-editors: Andreas Fickers (andreas.fickers@uni.lu) and Anne-Katrin Weber (anne-katrin.weber@unil.ch)

See www.viewjournal.eu for the current and back issues. VIEW is proud to be an open access journal. All articles are made findable through the DOAJ and EBSCO databases.

Photo credit: Michael Shaheen (CC ND-NC)

VIEW Issue 5: Television Histories in (Post)Socialist Europe

Author: Dana Mustata

cover_issue_5_en_USThe umbilical relation between television and national languages and cultures has made television in Eastern Europe hard to access outside national borders. The fifth issue of VIEW is entirely dedicated to television histories from Eastern Europe and lays the ground for this emerging area of study.

This special issue opens up new perspectives on television histories from Eastern Europe and situates them beyond the political histories of the nation-state, Cold War isolation and East-West antagonism. It invites readers to question what is ‘socialist’ about television in Europe and reflect upon concepts, methods and approaches pertaining to (post)socialist television in Europe.
 
The issue is guest edited at the initiative of The European (Post)Socialist Television History Network.  It continues the series of activities launched by the network with the aim to stimulate research on television histories from Eastern Europe, encourage comparative approaches to television in the region and create a dialogue with European television scholarship.
 
VIEW, the Journal of European Television History and Culture is the first peer-reviewed, multi-media and open access e-journal in the field of European television history and culture. It provides an international platform for outstanding academic research and archival reflection on television as an important part of our European cultural heritage.
 
VIEW is proud to present its fifth issue on ‘Television Histories in (Post)Socialist Europe,’ which is freely available at: http://journal.euscreen.eu/.
 
Table of Contents

Editorial
Editorial
Dana Mustata

Opening Article
Understanding Socialist Television: Concepts, Objects, Methods
Sabina Mihelj

Discoveries
The Eichmann Trial on East German Television
Judith Keilbach
Intervision. Searching for Traces
Yulia Yurtaeva
Folklore Music on Romanian TV. From State Socialist Television to Private Channels
Alexandra Urdea

Explorations
Exploring Transnational Media Exchange in the 1960s
Heather Gumbert
Connected Enemies? Programming Transfer between East and West During the Cold War and the Example of East German Television
Thomas Beutelschmidt, Richard Oehmig
The Great Époque of the Consumption of Imported Broadcasts. West European Television Channels and Polish Audiences during the System Transition
Patryk Wasiak
Italianization Accomplished. Forms and Structures of Albanian Television’s Dependency on Italian Media and Culture
Paolo Carelli
East and West on the Finnish Screen. Early Transnational Television in Finland
Mari Pajala
Retro Reappropriations. Responses to ‘The Thirty Cases of Major Zeman’ in the Czech Republic
Veronika Pehe
Multiple Faces of the Nostalgia Channel in Russia
Ekaterina Kalinina
The Problem of Personality on the Soviet Screen, 1950s-1960s
Simon Huxtable
Comparing Socialist and Post-Socialist Television Culture. Fifty Years of Television in Croatia
Zrinjka Peruško, Antonija Čuvalo

Call for Papers on Convergent Television(s)

CfP: VIEW Journal of European Television History and Culture Vol. 3, Issue 6

Convergent Television(s): Political Ideas, Industrial Strategies, Textual Features and Audience Practices.

Since the 1980s, media convergence has become a buzzword for media studies, a crucial site for academic debate and research and especially a major topic of interest for politics, media industries, technics, and audiences. The complex process of media convergence combines technical issues linked to digitization, political ideas of deregulation, corporate strategies of merging, and grassroots’ cultural practices.

TV studies have been discussing the topic of media convergence from many different angles and perspectives: political, institutional, technological, industrial, textual, and cultural issues of convergence have been put to the forefront. The theme of the Fall 2014 issue of VIEW seeks to shine a light on past and on-going processes of convergent television in different national and historical contexts. We welcome contributions that face the topic of convergence from different disciplinary and historical points of view.

Proposals are invited on (but not limited to):

  • Archaeology of TV Convergence: convergence before digitization;
  • Historical cases of successful and/or failed convergence in broadcasting;
  • National or international policies (especially at European level) that are specifically addressed to favour TV and broadcasting convergence;
  • Strategies of convergence (and effects of divergence): how different national broadcasters are confronting the challenges of media convergence and digitization in an innovative (or regressive) way;
  • Historical case studies in terms of convergent business strategies: how TV companies combined with other media or even other than media companies;
  • Players of TV convergence: national or multinational production companies committed to original content production;
  • Technical devices and affordances: how technology has affected the way of producing, distributing and use TV content in a more and more convergent manner;
  • The textual features of Convergent TV: how media convergence affects traditional TV genres, styles and aesthetics
  • Convergent TV formats, transmedia narratives and forms of branded content entertainment;
  • Changing audience habits and practices.

Contributions are encouraged from authors with different expertise and interests in television history, media studies, television studies, media history, political economy of communication, media economics and media industries, audience studies, television professionals and archivists.

Paper proposals (max. 500 words) are due on April 15th. Submissions should be sent to the managing editor of the journal, Dana Mustata (journal@euscreen.eu). Articles (2-4,000 words) will be due on July 1st.

For further information or questions about the issue, please contact the co-editors: Gabriele Balbi (gabriele.balbi@usi.ch) and Massimo Scaglioni (massimo.scaglioni@unicatt.it).

About VIEW Journal of European Television History and Culture

VIEW Journal logoVIEW, Journal of European Television History and Culture (http://viewjournal.eu) is the first peer-reviewed multi-media e-journal in the field of television studies. Offering an international platform for outstanding academic research on television, the journal has an interdisciplinary profile and acts both as a platform for critical reflection on the cultural, social and political role of television in Europe’s past and present as well as a multi-media platform for the circulation and use of digitized audiovisual material.

The journal’s main aim is to function as a showcase for a creative and innovative use of digitized television material in scholarly work, and to inspire a fruitful discussion between audiovisual heritage institutions (especially television archives) and a broader community of television experts and amateurs. In offering a unique technical infrastructure for a multi-media presentation of critical reflections on European television, the journal aims at stimulating innovative narrative forms of online storytelling, making use of the digitized audiovisual collections of television archives around Europe.

 

EUscreenXL presents issue 04 of VIEW Journal

VIEW Journal of European Television History and Culture Vol. 2, Issue 04: The Hidden Professions of Television

VIEW Journal cover issue 04

We know little about the ‘behind the scenes’ of television. The fourth issue of VIEW provides a rich and eclectic series of contributions from which a lot can be learnt about its ‘hidden’ professions.

VIEW, the Journal of European Television History and Culture is the first peer-reviewed, multi-media and open access e-journal in the field of
European television history and culture. It offers an international platform for outstanding academic research and archival reflection on television as an important part of our European cultural heritage.

The journal is proud to present its fourth issue:
Hidden Professions of Television has been guest-edited by Andy O’Dwyer and Tim O’Sulivan and is freely available from: http://www.viewjournal.eu

The articles presented here bring under scrutiny the ‘behind the scenes’ activities of television and their hidden, often unrecognised and uncelebrated personnel and processes. They engage across a wide range of organisational, administrative and technical activities that have played their understated, often ‘invisible’ part in the historical formation and development of television. We wish you a pleasant and inspiring journey through the Hidden Professions of Television!

Table of Contents

 

  • Editorial – Andy O’Dwyer, Tim O’Sulivan

DISCOVERIES

EXPLORATIONS

Open Access Journal Advances Scholarship in the Field of European Television History and Culture

VIEW Journal Vol 01 Issue 02/2012

Second VIEW Journal issue

In March 2012, EUscreen launched the first issue of the Journal of European Television History and Culture – the first peer-reviewed, multi-media and open access e-journal in the field of European television history and culture. It offers an international platform for outstanding academic research and archival reflection on television as an important part of our European cultural heritage. Today, EUscreen is proud to present the second issue: Europe on and behind the Screen, which is freely available at: http://journal.euscreen.eu

Embedded audiovisual sources

This second issue comes in a brand new form, with a new title: VIEW, a fresh design and a new member in the team of editors-in-chief: John Ellis from Royal Holloway, University of London.The journal makes use of an open access publishing system, OJS, and has developed a tool to insert relevant audiovisual sources in the online reading experience. The journal also received a redesign to maximise readability. The new name, VIEW, indicates a clear vision for the future of the Journal of European Television History and Culture.

Europe on and Behind the Screen

Its second issue enables a discussion of European television through different themes, approaches and case studies. The Discovery articles zoom in on case studies from different corners of Europe, while the Explorations offer different approaches to writing Europe’s television history and advancing theoretical discussions in the field. The full table of contents for the second issue is:

Editorial – Dana Mustata

DISCOVERIES

1.    Mapping Europe: Images of Europe in the Eurovision Song Contest – Mari Pajala
2.    Spain Was Not Living a Celebration. TVE and Eurovision Song Contest during the years of Franco’s Dictatorship – Juan Francisco Gutiérrez Lozano
3.    The Golden Stag Festival in Ceausescu’s Romania (1968-1971) – Alexandru Matei
4.    Comunicar Europa/Communicating Europe. Spain and television co-productions – Manuel Palacio & Concepción Cascajosa
5.    Zen and the Art of Adaptation – Jeremy Strong

EXPLORATIONS

1.    Live from Moscow: The Celebrations of Yuri Gagarin and Transnational Television in Europe – Lars Lundgren
2.    Reading Between The Lines. A Transnational History of the Franco-British Entente Cordial in Post War Television – Andreas Fickers & Andy O’Dwyer
3.    Transnational Relations Between The BBC And The WDR (1960-1969): The Central Roles Of Hugh Greene And Klaus Von Bismarck – Christian Potschka
4.    Poland’s Return to Europe:  Polish Terrestrial Broadcasters and TV-Fiction – Sylwia Szostak
5.    Hello, Lenin? Soviet Nostalgia on Post-Soviet Television – Kateryna Khinkulova
6.    From European Identity and Media Imperialism to Public Diplomacy: the Changing Rationale behind Euronews – Eva Polonska-Kimunguyi & Patrick Kimunguyi
7.    Télé-clubs and European Television History Beyond the Screen – Ira Wagman

As Dr. Dana Mustata from the University of Groningen, managing editor of the journal, says: “After the book A European Television History by Jonathan Bignell and Andreas Fickers, this issue on Europe on and behind the Screen is the second concerted effort on an European scale dedicated to advancing our understanding of European television.”

View, the Journal of European Television History and Culture, is published by the Netherlands Institute for Sound and Vision in collaboration with Utrecht University, Maastricht University and Royal Holloway University of London. With its interdisciplinary profile, the journal journal is open to many disciplinary perspectives on European television – including television history, media studies, media sociology, cultural studies and television studies. Read more about the journal.

More info

View is made possible by support from the EUscreen project and the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO). The journal works in partnership with the European Television History Network.

 

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