EUscreenXL presents issue 04 of VIEW Journal

VIEW Journal of European Television History and Culture Vol. 2, Issue 04: The Hidden Professions of Television

VIEW Journal cover issue 04

We know little about the ‘behind the scenes’ of television. The fourth issue of VIEW provides a rich and eclectic series of contributions from which a lot can be learnt about its ‘hidden’ professions.

VIEW, the Journal of European Television History and Culture is the first peer-reviewed, multi-media and open access e-journal in the field of
European television history and culture. It offers an international platform for outstanding academic research and archival reflection on television as an important part of our European cultural heritage.

The journal is proud to present its fourth issue:
Hidden Professions of Television has been guest-edited by Andy O’Dwyer and Tim O’Sulivan and is freely available from: http://www.viewjournal.eu

The articles presented here bring under scrutiny the ‘behind the scenes’ activities of television and their hidden, often unrecognised and uncelebrated personnel and processes. They engage across a wide range of organisational, administrative and technical activities that have played their understated, often ‘invisible’ part in the historical formation and development of television. We wish you a pleasant and inspiring journey through the Hidden Professions of Television!

Table of Contents

 

  • Editorial – Andy O’Dwyer, Tim O’Sulivan

DISCOVERIES

EXPLORATIONS

Open Access Journal Advances Scholarship in the Field of European Television History and Culture

VIEW Journal Vol 01 Issue 02/2012

Second VIEW Journal issue

In March 2012, EUscreen launched the first issue of the Journal of European Television History and Culture – the first peer-reviewed, multi-media and open access e-journal in the field of European television history and culture. It offers an international platform for outstanding academic research and archival reflection on television as an important part of our European cultural heritage. Today, EUscreen is proud to present the second issue: Europe on and behind the Screen, which is freely available at: http://journal.euscreen.eu

Embedded audiovisual sources

This second issue comes in a brand new form, with a new title: VIEW, a fresh design and a new member in the team of editors-in-chief: John Ellis from Royal Holloway, University of London.The journal makes use of an open access publishing system, OJS, and has developed a tool to insert relevant audiovisual sources in the online reading experience. The journal also received a redesign to maximise readability. The new name, VIEW, indicates a clear vision for the future of the Journal of European Television History and Culture.

Europe on and Behind the Screen

Its second issue enables a discussion of European television through different themes, approaches and case studies. The Discovery articles zoom in on case studies from different corners of Europe, while the Explorations offer different approaches to writing Europe’s television history and advancing theoretical discussions in the field. The full table of contents for the second issue is:

Editorial – Dana Mustata

DISCOVERIES

1.    Mapping Europe: Images of Europe in the Eurovision Song Contest – Mari Pajala
2.    Spain Was Not Living a Celebration. TVE and Eurovision Song Contest during the years of Franco’s Dictatorship – Juan Francisco Gutiérrez Lozano
3.    The Golden Stag Festival in Ceausescu’s Romania (1968-1971) – Alexandru Matei
4.    Comunicar Europa/Communicating Europe. Spain and television co-productions – Manuel Palacio & Concepción Cascajosa
5.    Zen and the Art of Adaptation – Jeremy Strong

EXPLORATIONS

1.    Live from Moscow: The Celebrations of Yuri Gagarin and Transnational Television in Europe – Lars Lundgren
2.    Reading Between The Lines. A Transnational History of the Franco-British Entente Cordial in Post War Television – Andreas Fickers & Andy O’Dwyer
3.    Transnational Relations Between The BBC And The WDR (1960-1969): The Central Roles Of Hugh Greene And Klaus Von Bismarck – Christian Potschka
4.    Poland’s Return to Europe:  Polish Terrestrial Broadcasters and TV-Fiction – Sylwia Szostak
5.    Hello, Lenin? Soviet Nostalgia on Post-Soviet Television – Kateryna Khinkulova
6.    From European Identity and Media Imperialism to Public Diplomacy: the Changing Rationale behind Euronews – Eva Polonska-Kimunguyi & Patrick Kimunguyi
7.    Télé-clubs and European Television History Beyond the Screen – Ira Wagman

As Dr. Dana Mustata from the University of Groningen, managing editor of the journal, says: “After the book A European Television History by Jonathan Bignell and Andreas Fickers, this issue on Europe on and behind the Screen is the second concerted effort on an European scale dedicated to advancing our understanding of European television.”

View, the Journal of European Television History and Culture, is published by the Netherlands Institute for Sound and Vision in collaboration with Utrecht University, Maastricht University and Royal Holloway University of London. With its interdisciplinary profile, the journal journal is open to many disciplinary perspectives on European television – including television history, media studies, media sociology, cultural studies and television studies. Read more about the journal.

More info

View is made possible by support from the EUscreen project and the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO). The journal works in partnership with the European Television History Network.

 

EUscreen releases open access Journal of European Television History and Culture

http://journal.euscreen.eu

Today, the EUscreen project releases the first peer-reviewed, multi-media and open access e-journal in the field of European television history and culture. The aim of this e-journal is to provide an international platform for outstanding research and reflection on television as an important part of our European cultural heritage.

The Journal of European Television History and Culture builds on recent digitisation initiatives in European archives and audiovisual libraries and addresses the need for critical study of the cultural, social and political role of television in Europe’s past and presence with the help of television material that has now become available at a large scale.

The first issue of the journal is a prototype, created in the open access publishing platform Open Journal Systems. The second version, due to appear in September 2012, will add important technical functionalities that will turn it into a true multimedia platform for online storytelling.

The Journal of European Television History and Culture has the ambition to speak to both the academic and the professional community but will address a larger audience interested in television as a cultural phenomenon, says Sonja de Leeuw, EUscreen’s project coordinator and editor-in-chief of the journal.

Broadcast historians, media studies scholars, audiovisual archivists, television professionals as well as the large group of enthusiastic fans of “old” television will have the opportunity to dive into the history and presence of European television by means of multi-media texts.

The journal is the result of a cooperation between the EUscreen platform and researchers from the European Television History Network (ETHN), which was launched in 2004 to promote a transnational perspective on the history and culture of television in Europe. It is published by the Utrecht University Library (Igitur publishing) in collaboration with Utrecht University, Maastricht University and Royal Holloway College / University of London and will be continued with funding from the Dutch National Research Board.

Visit http://journal.euscreen.eu to dive into Vol 1, No 1 (2012): Making Sense of Digital Sources

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